Home
Videos uploaded by user “The Best Film Archives”
Private Snafu - Fighting Tools | 1943 | WW2 Cartoon | US Army Animated Training Film | Animation
 
04:16
● Please SUPPORT my work on Patreon: https://bit.ly/2LT6opZ ● Visit my 2ND CHANNEL: https://bit.ly/2ILbyX8 ►Facebook: https://bit.ly/2INA7yt ►Twitter: https://bit.ly/2Lz57nY ►Google+: https://bit.ly/2IPz7dl ✚ Watch my "WW2-Era Cartoons" PLAYLIST: https://bit.ly/2GRclQH Private Snafu is the title character of a series of American instructional cartoon shorts, ironic and humorous in tone, that was produced by Warner Bros. between 1943 and 1945 during World War II. Snafu demonstrated to soldiers what not to do while at war. In this part: Private Snafu suffers the consequences of not keeping his equipment and weapons properly maintained. Private Snafu - Fighting Tools | 1943 | WW2 Cartoon | US Army Animated Training Film | Animation
Views: 526220 The Best Film Archives
Private Snafu - A Lecture on Camouflage | 1944 | WW2 Cartoon | US Army Animated Training Film
 
04:05
● Please SUPPORT my work on Patreon: https://bit.ly/2LT6opZ ● Visit my 2ND CHANNEL: https://bit.ly/2ILbyX8 ►Facebook: https://bit.ly/2INA7yt ►Twitter: https://bit.ly/2Lz57nY ►Google+: https://bit.ly/2IPz7dl ✚ Watch my "WW2-Era Cartoons" PLAYLIST: https://bit.ly/2GRclQH Private Snafu is the title character of a series of black-and-white American instructional cartoon shorts, ironic and humorous in tone, that were produced between 1943 and 1945. Private Snafu demonstrated to the soldiers what not to do in service and designed to improve troop morale during World War 2. The cartoons were produced to the US Army by Warner Bros. The voice of Private Snafu was performed by Mel Blanc. (Mel Blanc earned the nickname "The Man of a Thousand Voices". He is best remembered for his work as the voices of Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, Porky Pig, Tweety Bird, Sylvester the Cat, and many other characters.) In this part: Technical Fairy, First Class gives the troops "A Lecture On Camouflage" with the aid of Private Snafu. He points that modern camouflage, if used intelligently, is both an art and a science. Pvt. Snafu illustrates good and bad camouflage. HISTORICAL BACKGROUND / CONTEXT Military units have used camouflage of one kind or another since antiquity. However, with the invention of the airplane and the rise of aerial warfare, camouflage (to hide targets) and decoys (to draw fire away from real targets or to intimidate the enemy) became extremely important. Starfish sites: Britain was the target of heavy Luftwaffe bombing long before the U.S. was drawn into World War 2. The Germans were fond of nighttime bombing raids, so the British developed Q sites and Starfish sites as decoys. Q sites were areas of lights designed to attract bombs away from military installations such as airfields. The actual sites were under blackout conditions. Starfish sites were decoys of lights in the countryside that mimicked lights of cities. Operation Bertram: As Field Marshal Montgomery faced Erwin Rommel and his German forces in North Africa in 1942, British Brigadier Dudley Clarke launched Operation Bertram, in which fake equipment and munitions tricked the enemy into thinking the forces were miles from where they actually were. At the same time, the real artillery was hidden under fake supply trucks and other structures that appeared to be either useless or badly-camouflaged dummies. The deception was enhanced with false radio transmissions. German intelligence was convinced that the Allies' attack would come later, from a different direction, and involve at least one more armored division than they actually had. The deception contributed greatly to the victory in the Second Battle of El Alamein. Ghost Divisions: In the U.S., the the 23rd Headquarters Special Troops was charged with intimidating the German army by convincing them that the Allies had more troops and equipment than they actually had. The 23rd created a "ghost army" of transport vehicles, troop carriers, tanks, and munitions, all made of inflatable balloons, complete with sound effects. The U.S. Rubber Company even built inflatable airplanes (along with tanks and boats) to draw German fire away from the actual D-Day landing sites. Lockheed and Boeing airplane factories: Col. John F. Ohmer studied the camouflage and decoy techniques of the British in 1940, and wanted to reproduce them to protect the installations at Pearl Harbor. His proposal was rejected as too expensive. The attack on Pearl Harbor changed all that, and Ohmer was put in charge of a camouflage unit for U.S. targets on the West Coast. Among those targets were the Lockheed airplane factory in Burbank, California and the Boeing airplane factory in Seattle, Washington. Ohmer enlisted the help of Hollywood set builders and prop designers, as well as many civilian laborers and military personnel, to cover the factory with a fake residential neighborhood. Underneath, aircraft were being built for the war effort. Razzle dazzle ships: Camouflage at sea is a whole other ball of wax. The reflection of the water, lack of landmarks, movement, and the enemy's technology all combine to make hiding a ship vastly different from land-based disguises. During World War 1, German U-Boats fired torpedoes not at the ship itself, but where the ship was expected to be by the time the torpedo got there. By disguising not the ship, but the ship's speed, you could cause those torpedoes to miss their targets. To do this, British naval officer Norman Wilkinson developed Dazzle camouflage to confuse the enemy's eye into miscalculating the size and speed of a target. Forms of this camouflage are still used today. Private Snafu - A Lecture on Camouflage | 1944 | WW2 Cartoon | US Army Animated Training Film TBFA_0084 (DM_0043)
Views: 183268 The Best Film Archives
Commando Duck | Donald Duck vs. the Japanese | 1944 | WW2 Era Cartoon
 
06:55
● Please SUPPORT my work on Patreon: https://bit.ly/2LT6opZ ● Visit my 2ND CHANNEL: https://bit.ly/2ILbyX8 ►Facebook: https://bit.ly/2INA7yt ►Twitter: https://bit.ly/2Lz57nY ►Google+: https://bit.ly/2IPz7dl ✚ Watch my "WW2-Era Cartoons" PLAYLIST: https://bit.ly/2GRclQH Commando Duck is a World War 2-era cartoon released in 1944. Donald Duck is sent on a secret mission. After parachuting out of an airplane, Donald lands in the jungle of a remote Japanese island in the Pacific...
Views: 1120944 The Best Film Archives
How to Disable a Japanese Tank | Type 95 Ha-Go Light Tank | US Army Training Film | 1944
 
03:36
● Please SUPPORT my work on Patreon: https://bit.ly/2LT6opZ ● Visit my 2ND CHANNEL: https://bit.ly/2ILbyX8 ►Facebook: https://bit.ly/2INA7yt ►Twitter: https://bit.ly/2Lz57nY ►Google+: https://bit.ly/2IPz7dl ✚ Watch my "Military Training Films" PLAYLIST: https://bit.ly/2G6XIrN This 1944 short US Army training film evaluate the Japanese Type 95 Ha-Go light tank and also shows different ways how to disable it. About the Type 95: The Type 95 Ha-Gō (九五式軽戦車 ハ号) (also known as Ke-Go or Kyu-Go) was a light tank used by the Imperial Japanese Army from 1936 till 1945. It proved sufficient against infantry, but, not against other tanks. Approximately 2,300 units were produced, making it the most numerous Japanese armored vehicle of the time. The Type 95 was a 7.4-tonne vehicle with a complement of 3 crewmen: a commander, a hull machine gunner, and a driver. Only the commander was seated in the turret, hence he was responsible for observation, loading, aiming, firing the main gun, as well as decision-making and commanding the crew. The hand-operated turret was small and extremely cramped. Type 95 was fitted with 120 hp (89.5 kW) Mitsubishi A6120VDe air-cooled diesel engine. How to Disable a Japanese Tank | Type 95 Ha-Go Light Tank | US Army Training Film | 1944 TBFA_0045 (DM_0020)
Views: 166413 The Best Film Archives
Private Snafu - Spies | 1943 | US Army Animated Training Film
 
03:44
● Please SUPPORT my work on Patreon: https://bit.ly/2LT6opZ ● Visit my 2ND CHANNEL: https://bit.ly/2ILbyX8 ►Facebook: https://bit.ly/2INA7yt ►Twitter: https://bit.ly/2Lz57nY ►Google+: https://bit.ly/2IPz7dl ✚ Watch my "WW2-Era Cartoons" PLAYLIST: https://bit.ly/2GRclQH Private Snafu is the title character of a series of black-and-white American instructional cartoon shorts, ironic and humorous in tone, that were produced between 1943 and 1945. Private Snafu demonstrated to the soldiers what not to do in service and designed to improve troop morale. The cartoons were produced to the US Army by Warner Bros. The voice of Private Snafu was performed by Mel Blanc. Read more about the Private Snafu series: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Private_Snafu Private Snafu - Spies | 1943 | US Army Animated Training Film
Views: 97771 The Best Film Archives
Private Snafu - Gas | 1944 | US Army Animated Training Film
 
04:35
● Please SUPPORT my work on Patreon: https://bit.ly/2LT6opZ ● Visit my 2ND CHANNEL: https://bit.ly/2ILbyX8 ►Facebook: https://bit.ly/2INA7yt ►Twitter: https://bit.ly/2Lz57nY ►Google+: https://bit.ly/2IPz7dl ✚ Watch my "WW2-Era Cartoons" PLAYLIST: https://bit.ly/2GRclQH Private Snafu is the title character of a series of black-and-white American instructional cartoon shorts, ironic and humorous in tone, that were produced between 1943 and 1945. Private Snafu demonstrated to the soldiers what not to do in service and designed to improve troop morale. The cartoons were produced to the US Army by Warner Bros. The voice of Private Snafu was performed by Mel Blanc. Read more about the Private Snafu series: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Private_Snafu Private Snafu - Gas | 1944 | US Army Animated Training Film TBFA_0036 (DM_0014) NOTE: THE VIDEO REPRESENTS HISTORICAL EVENTS. SINCE IT WAS PRODUCED DECADES AGO, IT HAS HISTORICAL VALUES AND CAN BE CONSIDERED AS A VALUABLE HISTORICAL DOCUMENT. THE VIDEO HAS BEEN UPLOADED WITH EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES. ITS TOPIC IS REPRESENTED WITHIN HISTORICAL CONTEXT. THE VIDEO DOES NOT CONTAIN SENSITIVE SCENES AT ALL!
Views: 271145 The Best Film Archives
Private Snafu - No Buddy Atoll | 1945 | US Army Animated Training Film
 
04:56
● Please SUPPORT my work on Patreon: https://bit.ly/2LT6opZ ● Visit my 2ND CHANNEL: https://bit.ly/2ILbyX8 ►Facebook: https://bit.ly/2INA7yt ►Twitter: https://bit.ly/2Lz57nY ►Google+: https://bit.ly/2IPz7dl ✚ Watch my "WW2-Era Cartoons" PLAYLIST: https://bit.ly/2GRclQH Private Snafu is the title character of a series of black-and-white American instructional cartoon shorts, ironic and humorous in tone, that were produced between 1943 and 1945. Private Snafu demonstrated to the soldiers what not to do in service and designed to improve troop morale. The cartoons were produced to the US Army by Warner Bros. The voice of Private Snafu was performed by Mel Blanc. Read more about the Private Snafu series: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Private_Snafu Private Snafu - No Buddy Atoll | 1945 | US Army Animated Training Film TBFA_0034 (DM_0013) NOTE: THE VIDEO REPRESENTS HISTORICAL EVENTS. SINCE IT WAS PRODUCED DECADES AGO, IT HAS HISTORICAL VALUES AND CAN BE CONSIDERED AS A VALUABLE HISTORICAL DOCUMENT. THE VIDEO HAS BEEN UPLOADED WITH EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES. ITS TOPIC IS REPRESENTED WITHIN HISTORICAL CONTEXT. THE VIDEO DOES NOT CONTAIN SENSITIVE SCENES AT ALL!
Views: 108368 The Best Film Archives
The Ducktators | World War 2 Era Propaganda Cartoon | 1942
 
07:45
● Please SUPPORT my work on Patreon: https://bit.ly/2LT6opZ ● Visit my 2ND CHANNEL: https://bit.ly/2ILbyX8 ►Facebook: https://bit.ly/2INA7yt ►Twitter: https://bit.ly/2Lz57nY ►Google+: https://bit.ly/2IPz7dl ✚ Watch my "WW2-Era Cartoons" PLAYLIST: https://bit.ly/2GRclQH The Ducktators is a Looney Tunes black and white cartoon that was produced by Leon Schlesinger and was released in 1942 by Warner Bros. Directed by Norman McCabe, who would later direct Tokio Jokio (1943) too, The Ducktators satirizes various events of World War 2. The title is a pun on dictator. The Ducktators is a classic example of wartime propaganda. It is notable for being a satirical allegory of dictatorship portraying Adolf Hitler, Benito Mussolini and Emperor Hirohito (or Hideki Tojo) as ducks and geese who take over a farm, while a dove of peace feels powerless to stop them. The trio run amok in the farm yard spreading lies and bullying the other animals. Near the end, after being trampled in a failed attempt to end the ducktators' reign peacefully, the dove of peace gets upset, and wipes the floor with them all. The dove of peace is a controversial character. He most probably represents the U.S.’s British allies. The dove of peace says "Have they forgot? 'Tis love that's right, and naught is gained by show of might." This is clearly a caricature of the British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain, whose ineffectual policies emboldened the Axis leaders. Chamberlain is remembered for prematurely declaring that his appeasement of Hitler in the 1938 Munich Pact (here represented by a barnyard "Peace Conference") had secured "peace for our time." Later on, the wimpy Dove morphs into a pudgy, victorious Winston Churchill. The crazy rabbit with a long mustache at the end of the cartoon possibly based on Soviet leader Joseph Stalin. Overall, The Ducktators is a fascinating example of contemporary U.S. feelings towards its European allies. The cartoon draws to a patriotic close as the dove of peace sitting on an armchair, reminiscing the tale with pride to his kids. The final message of the cartoon states to the audience that if they wish to defeat the Axis Powers and bring peace to the world once again, all they have to do is to ensure the country's victory by buying United States Savings Bonds and Stamps. This is a wonderful positive propaganda piece that was designed to solidify everyone behind the war effort. The Ducktators remains quite possibly McCabe's strongest cartoon he directed. He nails every piece of political satire down to a tee, and for anyone that studies or has some extensive knowledge in World War 2 history, the parody is timeless. The concept of the political satire, with political figures playing as ducks and geese works wonderfully as a cartoon plot. Mel Blanc's use of vocal caricature on the ducktators are wonderfully exaggerated, and appealing; a rare gift you'll find little of nowadays. The ending with the U.S. Savings Bonds and Stamps poster has been rarely seen since the short was sold to Sunset Productions in the 1950s and syndicated through them (as Guild Films). (We uploaded to YouTube the original, uncut version of the cartoon.) HISTORICAL BACKGROUND / CONTEXT During active American involvement in the Second World War (1941–45), propaganda was used to increase support for the war and commitment to an Allied victory. Using a vast array of media, propagandists instigated antipathy for the enemy and support for America's allies. Patriotism became the central theme of advertising throughout the war, as large scale campaigns were launched to sell war bonds, promote efficiency in factories, reduce ugly rumors, and maintain civilian morale. As in Britain, American propaganda depicted the war as an issue of good versus evil, which allowed the government to encourage its population to fight a "just war," and used themes of resistance in and liberation to the occupied countries. In 1940, even prior to being drawn into World War 2, President Roosevelt urged every American to consider the effect if the dictatorships won in Europe and Asia. Films intended for the public were often meant to build morale. They allowed Americans to express their anger and frustration through ridicule and humor. Many films simply reflected the war culture and were pure entertainment. Others carried strong messages meant to arouse public involvement or set a public mood. Animation was increasingly used in political commentary against the Axis powers. The Ducktators | World War 2 Era Propaganda Cartoon | 1942 NOTE: THE VIDEO REPRESENTS HISTORY. SINCE IT WAS PRODUCED DECADES AGO, IT HAS HISTORICAL VALUES AND CAN BE CONSIDERED AS A VALUABLE HISTORICAL DOCUMENT. THE VIDEO HAS BEEN UPLOADED WITH EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES. ITS TOPIC IS REPRESENTED WITHIN HISTORICAL CONTEXT. THE VIDEO DOES NOT CONTAIN SENSITIVE SCENES AT ALL!
Views: 1060418 The Best Film Archives
Daffy - The Commando | 1943 | World War 2 Era Propaganda Cartoon
 
07:22
● Please SUPPORT my work on Patreon: https://bit.ly/2LT6opZ ● Visit my 2ND CHANNEL: https://bit.ly/2ILbyX8 ►Facebook: https://bit.ly/2INA7yt ►Twitter: https://bit.ly/2Lz57nY ►Google+: https://bit.ly/2IPz7dl ✚ Watch my "WW2-Era Cartoons" PLAYLIST: https://bit.ly/2GRclQH Daffy - The Commando is a 1943 Looney Tunes cartoon produced by Warner Bros. It features the character Daffy Duck. It was intended as an American propaganda film against the Nazi Germany while the two countries were at war. As with most of the Looney Tunes shorts produced during World War 2, the film consists of a series of rapid-fire, short gag vignettes. Daffy Duck is a commando, dropped behind enemy lines, and causes havoc to the German commander, Uberkomt von Vultur, who tries to capture him. Most of the cartoon involves a series of comedic mishaps with Daffy foiling Von Vulture, but it’s the ending that makes this cartoon extremely memorable. Daffy Duck is fired out of a cannon and lands right in Berlin where Adolf Hitler is making a speech; as Hitler is just rambling on in a nonsensical mix of English and German (with a stereotypical German accent), Daffy whacks him with a cartoon mallet, causing Hitler to cry like a baby. All of the voices in the cartoon were performed by Mel Blanc. (Mel Blanc earned the nickname "The Man of a Thousand Voices". He is best remembered for his work as the voices of Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, Porky Pig, Tweety Bird, Sylvester the Cat, and many other Looney Tunes characters.) HISTORICAL BACKGROUND / CONTEXT On 11 December 1941, four days after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and the United States declaration of war against the Japanese Empire, Nazi Germany declared war against the United States, in response to what was claimed to be a series of provocations by the United States government when the US was still officially neutral during World War 2. The decision to declare war was made by Adolf Hitler, apparently offhand, almost without consultation. Later that day, the United States declared war on Germany. The course of relations between Germany and the United States had deteriorated since the beginning of World War 2, inevitably so given the increasing cooperation between the United States and the United Kingdom. The Destroyers for Bases Agreement, Lend-Lease, the Atlantic Charter, the hand-over of military control of Iceland from the United Kingdom to the United States, the extension of the Pan-American Security Zone, and many other results of the special relationship which had developed between the two countries had put a strain on relations between the US, still technically a neutral country, and Nazi Germany. US destroyers escorting American supply vessels bound for the UK were already engaged in a de facto war with German U-Boats. Roosevelt's desire to help the UK, despite the objections of the influential US isolationist lobby, and legal impediments imposed by Congress which prevented direct involvement in the war, brought the US to push hard against the traditional boundaries of neutrality. On December 7, 1941, the Empire of Japan launched an attack on the US naval and army base on Pearl Harbor in Hawaii, beginning a war between Japan and the United States. Japan had not informed its ally, Germany, in advance of the attack, although the Japanese ambassador had informed the German Foreign Minister, Joachim von Ribbentrop, at the beginning of December that relations between the US and the Japanese Empire were at a breaking point, and that war was imminent. He was instructed to ask Germany for commitment to declare war under the terms of the Tripartite Pact should that occur... Daffy - The Commando | 1943 | World War 2 Era Propaganda Cartoon TBFA_0082 (DM_0041)
Views: 96995 The Best Film Archives
Kill or Be Killed | U.S. Army WW2 Training Film | Self Defense and Combat Techniques, Hand Weapons
 
09:44
● Please SUPPORT my work on Patreon: https://bit.ly/2LT6opZ ● Visit my 2ND CHANNEL: https://bit.ly/2ILbyX8 ►Facebook: https://bit.ly/2INA7yt ►Twitter: https://bit.ly/2Lz57nY ►Google+: https://bit.ly/2IPz7dl ✚ Watch my "Military Training Films" PLAYLIST: https://bit.ly/2G6XIrN This World War 2 era military training film created by the U.S. War Department demonstrates that there are no rules of sportsmanship or fair play on the battlefield, especially in a self-defense situation. As expressed in the film: "anything goes when the stakes are kill or be killed". Soldiers were encouraged to use any weapon that comes to hand in order to defend themselves. Weapon could be anything from a rifle, to a bayonet or hand grenade. HISTORICAL BACKGROUND / CONTEXT The first U.S. Army Combatives Manual was published in 1852. It was a translation of a French bayonet fighting manual. Since that time the Army has always had Combatives training doctrine although not always successful combatives training. Bayonet fencing, as outlined in the 1852 manual remained the universally accepted training method, not only in the U.S. Army but in every European style army in the world until its effectiveness was shown to be lacking on the battlefields and in the trenches of World War 1. (In the confined space of a trench the techniques and weapons designed with the fencing strip in mind proved themselves worse than useless.) This time saw the first attempts to teach unarmed fighting to Soldier in an organized way on any kind of large scale. In the late 1800s, there were several attempts to teach Jiu-Jitsu and Judo in the U.S. Army. With the rapid expansion of armies demanded by the World War 1, there was little time available to teach the average Soldier the complex techniques of Judo and Jiu-Jitsu. Because of this and the failure of Bayonet fencing as a training method for trench warfare the Army lost faith in skill based Combatives training. In the interwar years such non-skill based training methods as Pugil sticks and the bayonet assault course gained prominence. World War 2 saw a flowering of attempts at successful Combatives training. Many of the top names from boxing and wrestling at the time were brought in to train the various services. Most had very limited success, once again because of the limited amount of training time available with the demands of fielding an Army of several million men. The most successful programs were offshoots from the British Commando training taught by William E. Fairbairn and Eric A. Sykes. These two had trained the police force in Shanghai, China before the war and with their depth of real world experience, Fairbairn was also a second degree black belt in Judo, had been brought back to Britain early in the war. Personally in the case of Fairbairn, and through their American protégé COL Rex Applegate, their program of practicing a limited number of simple, effective techniques, emphasis on aggressiveness and stressing the incivility of real fights (COL Applegate wrote a manual titled “Kill or Get Killed” in 1943 and Fairbairn often referred to what he taught as “Gutter Fighting”). They were able to somewhat overcome the limitations of limited training time. COL Applegate also used feedback from the field to adjust the curriculum. By the end of the World War 2 thousands of Soldiers had been trained in their methods. World War 2 combatives were close quarters combat techniques, including hand-to-hand, advanced firearm point shooting methods, and weapons techniques (knife / bayonet / improvised weapons). Distinctions between World War 2 combatives and modern combatives include: 1) The former is based upon explosive high percentage gross motor strikes to vital targets, whereas the latter is based upon fine motor skill grappling. 2) The former seeks primarily to disable the enemy as quickly as possible at all costs, whereas the latter seeks primarily to build "warrior ethos" and the courage to close with the enemy. Kill or Be Killed | U.S. Army WW2 Training Film | Self Defense and Combat Techniques, Hand Weapons
Views: 922723 The Best Film Archives
Private Snafu - In the Aleutians | 1945 | WW2 Cartoon | US Army Animated Training Film
 
04:33
● Please SUPPORT my work on Patreon: https://bit.ly/2LT6opZ ● Visit my 2ND CHANNEL: https://bit.ly/2ILbyX8 ►Facebook: https://bit.ly/2INA7yt ►Twitter: https://bit.ly/2Lz57nY ►Google+: https://bit.ly/2IPz7dl ✚ Watch my "WW2-Era Cartoons" PLAYLIST: https://bit.ly/2GRclQH Private Snafu is the title character of a series of black-and-white American instructional cartoon shorts, ironic and humorous in tone, that were produced between 1943 and 1945. Private Snafu demonstrated to the soldiers what not to do in service and designed to improve troop morale. The cartoons were produced to the US Army by Warner Bros. The voice of Private Snafu was performed by Mel Blanc. (Mel Blanc earned the nickname "The Man of a Thousand Voices". He is best remembered for his work as the voices of Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, Porky Pig, Tweety Bird, Sylvester the Cat, and many other characters.) In this part: A humorous look at the Aleutian Islands and their strategic value. The film describes the hardships of a posting in the Aleutians, describing the severe climactic conditions in an ironic voiceover commentary. During the Aleutian Islands Campaign in World War 2, thousands of U.S. servicemen were stationed in the islands. Read more about the Private Snafu series: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Private_Snafu Historical Background / Context: The Aleutian Islands Campaign was a military campaign conducted by the United States in the Aleutian Islands, part of the Alaska Territory, in the American theater and the Pacific theater of World War 2 starting on 3 June 1942. A small Japanese force occupied the islands of Attu and Kiska, but the remoteness of the islands and the difficulties of weather and terrain meant that it took nearly a year for a far larger U.S. - Canadian force to eject them. The islands' strategic value was their ability to control Pacific transportation routes. The Japanese reasoned that control of the Aleutians would prevent a possible U.S. attack across the Northern Pacific. Similarly, the U.S. feared that the islands would be used as bases from which to launch aerial assaults against the West Coast. A battle to reclaim Attu was launched on May 11, 1943 and completed following a final Japanese banzai charge on May 29. On 15 August 1943, an invasion force landed on Kiska in the wake of a sustained three-week barrage, only to discover the Japanese had abandoned the island on July 29. The campaign is known as the "Forgotten Battle", due to being overshadowed by the simultaneous Guadalcanal Campaign. In the past, many western military historians believed it was a diversionary or feint attack during the Battle of Midway meant to draw out the U.S. Pacific Fleet from Midway Atoll, and was in fact launched simultaneously under the same overall commander, Isoroku Yamamoto. However, historians Jonathan Parshall and Anthony Tully have made an argument against this interpretation, stating that the Japanese invaded the Aleutians to protect the northern flank of their empire and did not intend it as a diversion. Private Snafu - In the Aleutians | 1945 | WW2 Cartoon | US Army Animated Training Film TBFA_0068 (DM_0033)
Views: 48268 The Best Film Archives
Private Snafu - Going Home | 1944 | WW2 Cartoon | US Army Animated Training Film
 
03:22
● Please SUPPORT my work on Patreon: https://bit.ly/2LT6opZ ● Visit my 2ND CHANNEL: https://bit.ly/2ILbyX8 ►Facebook: https://bit.ly/2INA7yt ►Twitter: https://bit.ly/2Lz57nY ►Google+: https://bit.ly/2IPz7dl ✚ Watch my "WW2-Era Cartoons" PLAYLIST: https://bit.ly/2GRclQH Private Snafu is the title character of a series of black-and-white American instructional cartoon shorts, ironic and humorous in tone, that were produced between 1943 and 1945. Private Snafu demonstrated to the soldiers what not to do in service and designed to improve troop morale during World War 2. The cartoons were produced to the US Army by Warner Bros. The voice of Private Snafu was performed by Mel Blanc. (Mel Blanc earned the nickname "The Man of a Thousand Voices". He is best remembered for his work as the voices of Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, Porky Pig, Tweety Bird, Sylvester the Cat, and many other characters.) In this episode: Private Snafu returns from the "global grind" of World War 2 to the United States home front, on leave from the military. His ship enter the New York Harbor, then he makes his way to his hometown. The narrator explains that Snafu, the town's "returning hero", feels "safe at home, away from battle". He also feels safe in discussing military matters with civilians, including restricted information. Snafu's unit suffers the consequences of blabbing military secrets… Going Home was never released because it contained a depiction of a secret weapon too close to an actual military secret: the atomic bomb – a weapon able to obliterate an entire island. HISTORICAL BACKGROUND / CONTEXT During World War 2 (1939-1945) keeping military secrets was a matter of life or death. In the 1940s, operations security meant avoiding talking or writing openly about military actions, in order to keep critical information from reaching the ears of adversaries. The U.S. Office of War Information issued dozens of propaganda products, like posters and films, to persuade Americans – civilians and military personnel both – to support the war effort by keeping quiet about what they might know about. Operations security (OPSEC) is a term originating in U.S. military jargon, as a process that identifies critical information to determine if friendly actions can be observed by enemy intelligence, determines if information obtained by adversaries could be interpreted to be useful to them, and then executes selected measures that eliminate or reduce adversary exploitation of friendly critical information. In a more general sense, OPSEC is the process of protecting individual pieces of data that could be grouped together to give the bigger picture (called aggregation). OPSEC is the protection of critical information deemed mission essential from military commanders, senior leaders, management or other decision-making bodies. Nowadays, the process results in the development of countermeasures, which include technical and non-technical measures such as the use of email encryption software, taking precautions against eavesdropping, paying close attention to a picture you have taken (such as items in the background), or not talking openly on social media sites about information on the unit, activity or organization's Critical Information List. Private Snafu - Going Home | 1944 | WW2 Cartoon | US Army Animated Training Film TBFA_0089 (DM_0047)
Views: 45773 The Best Film Archives
Private Snafu - Censored | 1944 | US Army Animated Training Film
 
04:54
● Please SUPPORT my work on Patreon: https://bit.ly/2LT6opZ ● Visit my 2ND CHANNEL: https://bit.ly/2ILbyX8 ►Facebook: https://bit.ly/2INA7yt ►Twitter: https://bit.ly/2Lz57nY ►Google+: https://bit.ly/2IPz7dl ✚ Watch my "WW2-Era Cartoons" PLAYLIST: https://bit.ly/2GRclQH Private Snafu is the title character of a series of black-and-white American instructional cartoon shorts, ironic and humorous in tone, that were produced between 1943 and 1945. Private Snafu demonstrated to the soldiers what not to do in service and designed to improve troop morale. The cartoons were produced to the US Army by Warner Bros. The voice of Private Snafu was performed by Mel Blanc. Read more about the Private Snafu series: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Private_Snafu Private Snafu - Censored | 1944 | US Army Animated Training Film
Views: 266040 The Best Film Archives
Private Snafu - Rumors | 1943 | WW2 Cartoon | US Army Animated Training Film
 
04:35
● Please SUPPORT my work on Patreon: https://bit.ly/2LT6opZ ● Visit my 2ND CHANNEL: https://bit.ly/2ILbyX8 ►Facebook: https://bit.ly/2INA7yt ►Twitter: https://bit.ly/2Lz57nY ►Google+: https://bit.ly/2IPz7dl ✚ Watch my "WW2-Era Cartoons" PLAYLIST: https://bit.ly/2GRclQH Private Snafu is the title character of a series of black-and-white American instructional cartoon shorts, ironic and humorous in tone, that were produced between 1943 and 1945. Private Snafu demonstrated to the soldiers what not to do in service and designed to improve troop morale during World War 2. The cartoons were produced to the US Army by Warner Bros. The voice of Private Snafu was performed by Mel Blanc. (Mel Blanc earned the nickname "The Man of a Thousand Voices". He is best remembered for his work as the voices of Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, Porky Pig, Tweety Bird, Sylvester the Cat, and many other characters.) In this episode: Taking a chance remark that the weather is good for bombing, Private Snafu carelessly starts a mistaken rumor that the base is about to be bombed. The story grows more exaggerated with each passing turn. Eventually, a panic breaks out that a bombing is imminent. In the end, nothing happens, but the base is quarantined and Snafu is locked up in a psychopathic ward. This 1943 animation classic demonstrates how rumors start and affect Army morale. All Snafu cartoons are built around morale and hard lessons, but Rumors remains unique for portraying an important message in surrealistic fashion. The use of "flying baloneys" are absurdist in its conception - but it's an innovative portrayal of how dangerous rumors can be, and the possible consequences that even a nation could suffer from. In particular, the military was apparently very concerned about loose-lipped soldiers spreading rumors and giving away information to the enemy. With titles like Spies (1943), Rumors (1943), and Censored (1944), the Snafu films present a primer on keeping one’s mouth shut. HISTORICAL BACKGROUND / CONTEXT Rumor is mouth-to-mouth communication of unconfirmed stories and anecdotes. It is the most primitive kind of news, and it is just as inefficient and inaccurate as it is primitive. Rumors and gossip might be a part of human nature, but it can be dangerous for a large number of factors. It is an endearing feature of the human psyche; evoking emotion and sparkling attention. The more spread the rumors are, the more exaggerated they become. Especially do rumors spread when war requires secrecy on many important matters. The customary sources of news no longer give out enough information, both because the news is unavailable to them and because, even if it were available, censorship is often expedient. If people cannot learn through legitimate channels all that they would like to learn or are anxious to learn, they pick up "news" wherever they can get it. When that happens, rumor thrives. Rumor thrives in the armed forces as well as among civilians since it is so often necessary to keep the soldiers to some extent uninformed, especially as regards future military operations. Military leaders have, however, to guard against rumor because it can disrupt carefully prepared plans by leading to loss of morale, or even to panic and defeat. According to H. H. Garner, an Army psychiatrist in World War 2, anything which reduced the soldier's morale could also predispose troops to panic. One of the predispositional variables is the powerful force of rumor. For instance, toward the end of World War 2, rumors spread throughout Holland among the Dutch concerning the rapid advance of the Allies into their country. Actually, only a few advance units had crossed the border from Belgium at the time. The rumors among the people so strongly influenced the German troops that they started a panicky retreat to the German frontier (their flight was stopped by German troops at their own border). Private Snafu - Rumors | 1943 | WW2 Cartoon | US Army Animated Training Film TBFA_0150 (DM_0077) NOTE: THE VIDEO REPRESENTS HISTORY. SINCE IT WAS PRODUCED DECADES AGO, IT HAS HISTORICAL VALUES AND CAN BE CONSIDERED AS A VALUABLE HISTORICAL DOCUMENT. THE VIDEO HAS BEEN UPLOADED WITH EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES. ITS TOPIC IS REPRESENTED WITHIN HISTORICAL CONTEXT. THE VIDEO DOES NOT CONTAIN SENSITIVE SCENES AT ALL!
Views: 28702 The Best Film Archives
Private Snafu vs Malaria Mike | 1944 | US Army Animated Training Film
 
04:53
● Please SUPPORT my work on Patreon: https://bit.ly/2LT6opZ ● Visit my 2ND CHANNEL: https://bit.ly/2ILbyX8 ►Facebook: https://bit.ly/2INA7yt ►Twitter: https://bit.ly/2Lz57nY ►Google+: https://bit.ly/2IPz7dl ✚ Watch my "WW2-Era Cartoons" PLAYLIST: https://bit.ly/2GRclQH Private Snafu is the title character of a series of black-and-white American instructional cartoon shorts, ironic and humorous in tone, that were produced between 1943 and 1945. Private Snafu demonstrated to the soldiers what not to do in service and designed to improve troop morale. The cartoons were produced to the US Army by Warner Bros. The voice of Private Snafu was performed by Mel Blanc. (Mel Blanc earned the nickname "The Man of a Thousand Voices". He is best remembered for his work as the voices of Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, Porky Pig, Tweety Bird, Sylvester the Cat, and many other characters.) In this part: Private Snafu faces a malaria-transmitting mosquito, Malaria Mike alias Amos Quito. The cartoon provides information about how easily malaria can be contracted without taking precautions. It shows Snafu making a catalogue of errors such as not using repellent. Read more about the Private Snafu series: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Private_Snafu Historical background / context: In the Pacific War during World War II, the lack of mosquito control measures had caused malaria to reach epidemic status. Entire infected units had to be evacuated before actually experiencing combat. Early in the War, it was estimated that malaria caused eight to ten times as many casualties than the battlefield. In 1943, James C. Magee, Surgeon General of the United States Army, created special units to plan and carry out malaria control. Private Snafu vs Malaria Mike | 1944 | US Army Animated Training Film TBFA_0063 (DM_0030)
Views: 27858 The Best Film Archives
Battle of the Bismarck Sea | US & Australian Air Raid on Japanese Ships | 1943 | WW2 Newsreel
 
09:37
● Please SUPPORT my work on Patreon: https://bit.ly/2LT6opZ ● Visit my 2ND CHANNEL: https://bit.ly/2ILbyX8 ►Facebook: https://bit.ly/2INA7yt ►Twitter: https://bit.ly/2Lz57nY ►Google+: https://bit.ly/2IPz7dl ✚ Watch my "WW2 in the Pacific" PLAYLIST: https://bit.ly/2KUw6ZY Amazing vintage newsreel of the Battle of the Bismarck Sea in the Pacific during World War 2 (2–4 March 1943). Aircraft of the U.S. Fifth Air Force and the Royal Australian Air Force attacked a Japanese convoy that was carrying troops to reinforce their position in New Guinea. Most of the ships were destroyed. This was one of the first Allied victories in the Pacific. The newsreel has some great footage of Bristol Beaufighters, Douglas A-20 Havocs, Curtiss P-40s and Lockheed P-38 fighters in action. HISTORICAL BACKGROUND / CONTEXT The Battle of the Bismarck Sea (2–4 March 1943) took place in the South West Pacific Area (SWPA) during World War 2 when aircraft of the U.S. Fifth Air Force and the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) attacked a Japanese convoy carrying troops to Lae, New Guinea. Most of the task force was destroyed, and Japanese troop losses were heavy. The Japanese convoy was a result of a Japanese Imperial General Headquarters decision in December 1942 to reinforce their position in the South West Pacific. A plan was devised to move some 6,900 troops from Rabaul (on the island of New Britain) directly to Lae. The plan was understood to be risky, because Allied air power in the area was strong, but it was decided to proceed because otherwise the troops would have to be landed a considerable distance away and march through inhospitable swamp, mountain and jungle terrain without roads before reaching their destination. On 28 February 1943, the convoy – comprising eight destroyers and eight troop transports with an escort of approximately 100 fighters – set out from Simpson Harbor in Rabaul. The Allies had detected preparations for the convoy, and naval codebreakers in Melbourne (FRUMEL) and Washington, D.C., had decrypted and translated messages indicating the convoy’s intended destination and date of arrival. The Allied Air Forces had developed new techniques they hoped would improve the chances of successful air attack on ships. They detected and shadowed the convoy, which came under sustained air attack on 2–3 March 1943. Follow-up attacks by PT boats (Patrol Torpedo boats) and aircraft were made on 4 March. All eight transports and four of the escorting destroyers were sunk. Out of 6,900 troops who were badly needed in New Guinea, only about 1,200 made it to Lae. Another 2,700 were rescued by destroyers and submarines and returned to Rabaul. The Japanese made no further attempts to reinforce Lae by ship, greatly hindering their ultimately unsuccessful efforts to stop Allied offensives in New Guinea. Battle of the Bismarck Sea | US & Australian Air Raid on Japanese Ships | 1943 | WW2 Newsreel TBFA_0087 (DM_0045) NOTE: THE VIDEO DOCUMENTS HISTORICAL EVENTS. SINCE IT WAS PRODUCED DECADES AGO, IT HAS HISTORICAL VALUES AND CAN BE CONSIDERED AS A VALUABLE HISTORICAL DOCUMENT. THE VIDEO HAS BEEN UPLOADED WITH EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES. ITS TOPIC IS REPRESENTED WITHIN HISTORICAL CONTEXT. THE VIDEO DOES NOT CONTAIN SENSITIVE SCENES AT ALL!
Views: 33610 The Best Film Archives
What Did WW2 Soldiers Eat | US Military Food Rations | Documentary | ca. 1943
 
09:52
● Please SUPPORT my work on Patreon: https://bit.ly/2LT6opZ ● Visit my 2ND CHANNEL: https://bit.ly/2ILbyX8 ►Facebook: https://bit.ly/2INA7yt ►Twitter: https://bit.ly/2Lz57nY ►Google+: https://bit.ly/2IPz7dl ✚ Watch my "Military Training Films" PLAYLIST: https://bit.ly/2G6XIrN It is a (circa) 1943 documentary made by the United States Office of War Information about the US military food rations during World War 2. It explains the importance of good nutritious food for the US soldiers. Dehydrated and process food was developed during that time. A very informative production of its time. Historical background / context: The United States military ration refers to various preparations and packages of food provided to feed members of the armed forces. U.S. military rations are often made for quick distribution, preparation, and eating in the field and tend to have long storage times in adverse conditions due to being thickly packaged and/or shelf-stable. The current ration is the Meal, Ready-to-Eat (MRE). Field Rations during World War 2 After 1918, the US army ration system went through several revisions. By June 1945, the US Army had 157 nutrition officers. Between 1941 and 1946, more than 30 field ration surveys were conducted to assess health, performance and nutritional status of troops in different environments. The main rations were: - A-ration: Garrison Ration. Fresh, refrigerated, or frozen food prepared in dining halls or field kitchens. The most valued of all rations. - B-ration: Field Ration. Canned, packaged, or preserved foods normally prepared in field kitchens without refrigeration. - C-ration: Individual Ration. A complete pre-cooked, ready-to-eat canned individual meal. - K-ration: Individual Ration. Designed as a short duration individual "assault" ration for paratroopers and other specialized light infantry forces. - D-ration: Emergency Ration. Bars of concentrated chocolate combined with other ingredients to provide high calorie content. A-rations were generally whatever meat and produce could be obtained locally, so there could be great variety from one theatre of operations to the next. B-rations were generally used when there was inadequate refrigeration for perishable A-rations. The composition of the D-ration did not change much throughout the war but the C-ration developed many variations. A- and B-rations were only served at bases or established camps in rear areas as they require cooking. C-rations could be eaten hot or cold and required no special preparation or storage, so these could be served almost anywhere. During the war a new ration for assault troops, the 2,830 calories K-ration, was developed. K-rations were originally intended to be used as short duration rations for only 2–3 days, but cost concerns and later standardization led to its overuse, contributing in some cases to vitamin deficiencies and malnourishment. There were various other special rations developed for specific circumstances, like: - Mountain ration: 4,800 calories. - Jungle ration: 4,000 calories. - The Assault Lunch: Chocolate bars, caramels, dried fruit, chewing gum, peanuts, salt tablets, cigarettes, matches, and water purification tablets; total of 1,500–2,000 calories. - The Assault ration (Pacific Theater): 28 pieces of assorted hard candy, chewing gum, cigarettes and a chocolate peanut bar. What Did WW2 Soldiers Eat | US Military Food Rations | Documentary | ca. 1943 TBFA_0064 (DM_0031)
Views: 891708 The Best Film Archives
Duck and Cover | 1951 | How to Survive a Nuclear Attack | Cold War Classic Educational Film
 
09:14
● Please SUPPORT my work on Patreon: https://bit.ly/2LT6opZ ● Visit my 2ND CHANNEL: https://bit.ly/2ILbyX8 ►Facebook: https://bit.ly/2INA7yt ►Twitter: https://bit.ly/2Lz57nY ►Google+: https://bit.ly/2IPz7dl ✚ Watch my "Atomic Age" PLAYLIST: https://bit.ly/2IQudNe It is a famous Civil Defense film for children in which Bert the Turtle shows what to do in case of atomic attack. In 1949 the Soviet Union tested its first nuclear explosive. After it, the duck-and-cover exercises quickly became a part of Civil Defense drills that every American citizen, from children to the elderly, practiced to be ready in the event of nuclear war. Duck and Cover | 1951 | How to Survive a Nuclear Attack | Cold War Classic Educational Film
Views: 86385 The Best Film Archives
WW2 Training Film for US Soldiers | How to Behave in Britain | 1943
 
37:54
● Please SUPPORT my work on Patreon: https://bit.ly/2LT6opZ ● Visit my 2ND CHANNEL: https://bit.ly/2ILbyX8 ►Facebook: https://bit.ly/2INA7yt ►Twitter: https://bit.ly/2Lz57nY ►Google+: https://bit.ly/2IPz7dl ✚ Watch my "Military Training Films" PLAYLIST: https://bit.ly/2G6XIrN This 1943 educational / training film (originally titled as ‘A Welcome to Britain’) introduces US soldiers to Britain and tells them what to expect, how to behave and how not to behave in Britain during World War 2. The film aims to explain British culture and character. Starting with the ubiquitous pub visit, the film breezes through geography lessons, food, entertainment and traveling on the British Home Front. It was made by the Ministry of Information (United Kingdom) with the assistance of the US Office of War Information. Remarkably the film is not a patronizing propaganda piece like so many other similar productions made during the war. HISTORICAL BACKGROUND / CONTEXT The United States and Great Britain have been firm allies for a century. Their mutually beneficial relationship particularly deepened during World War 2, when the circumstances of war brought hundreds of thousands of Americans through the British Isles. The United States entered the war in December 1941, and American ground forces arrived in Belfast the following month. By February 1942 members of the U.S. Eighth Air Force were on the ground, building towards a strategic bombing campaign. American and British naval and air units cooperated in fierce battles for the control of the Atlantic. The U.S. troop build-up progressed quickly at first to support Operation Bolero, the buildup for a proposed invasion of France. Bolero was suspended amidst concerns that a 1942 or 1943 cross-channel invasion would be premature, and troops were diverted to North Africa and the Mediterranean. In the second half of 1943 the American buildup in Great Britain resumed in earnest. The United Kingdom served as a critical base for American operations throughout the war. U.S. troops embarked from there for the invasion of North Africa in November 1942, and for subsequent operations in the Mediterranean. American units participating in the Combined Bomber Offensive and the air war over Europe were based in England. Great Britain served as the training ground and staging area for Operation Overlord, the massive amphibious invasion of Europe through Normandy on June 6, 1944 – D-Day. Over 1,600,000 American servicemen and women were in Great Britain as the invasion was launched. Numbers dwindled thereafter, but as late as April 30, 1945 there were still over 224,000 airmen, 109,000 communications zone troops, and 100,000 in hospitals or preparing to serve as individual replacements. At the height of the American presence in Great Britain, American servicemen and women were ubiquitous through much of the island nation. They built or occupied vast encampments of their own, but also spent time in local pubs and establishments, toured the countryside, and befriended British families. Both nations established impressive programs to bring the two cultures together amicably, and to accommodate and entertain the visitors. Tens of thousands of American servicemen married English women, bringing them back to the United States after the war ended. American Forces Radio Network broadcast from the United Kingdom, bringing music and news from “home” to the British air waves. American Red Cross Service Clubs opened to entertain American servicemen off their bases. Pieces of American life and culture were seen and felt across the United Kingdom throughout the war, and Americans in turn took pieces of British life and culture home with them. WW2 Training Film for US Soldiers | How to Behave in Britain | 1943 TBFA_0109 (DM_0057) NOTE: THE VIDEO REPRESENTS HISTORY. SINCE IT WAS PRODUCED DECADES AGO, IT HAS HISTORICAL VALUES AND CAN BE CONSIDERED AS A VALUABLE HISTORICAL DOCUMENT. THE VIDEO HAS BEEN UPLOADED WITH EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES. ITS TOPIC IS REPRESENTED WITHIN HISTORICAL CONTEXT. THE VIDEO DOES NOT CONTAIN SENSITIVE SCENES AT ALL!
Views: 793922 The Best Film Archives
1940 Ford Cars & New Improvements | Ford Motor Co. Promotional Film | ca. 1940
 
03:41
● Please SUPPORT my work on Patreon: https://bit.ly/2LT6opZ ● Visit my 2ND CHANNEL: https://bit.ly/2ILbyX8 ►Facebook: https://bit.ly/2INA7yt ►Twitter: https://bit.ly/2Lz57nY ►Google+: https://bit.ly/2IPz7dl ✚ Watch my "Old America" PLAYLIST: https://bit.ly/2rOHzmy This Ford Motor Company promotional film introduces the new 1940 model cars to the Ford sales force. The film represents new improvements and features. It promotes the Deluxe 2-door Sedan, the Deluxe 4-door Sedan, the Deluxe Coupe, the Deluxe Business Coupe and the Deluxe Convertible Club Coupe. They were available with either the 85 horsepower engine or with the 60 horsepower engine at a much lower price. The Ford Deluxe was produced from 1938 to 1941. Note that at 0:10 the narrator seems to be speaking of new features for 1942, however, the cars shown are 1940 models. HISTORICAL BACKGROUND / CONTEXT The Ford line of cars was updated in 1937 with one major change - the introduction of an entry-level 136 CID (2.2 L) V8 in addition to the popular 221 CID (3.6 L) flathead V8. The model was a refresh of its predecessor, the Model 48, and was the company's main product. It was redesigned more thoroughly in 1941. At the start of production, it cost $850. The Ford Line bore several model numbers during this period: For domestic 1937 production in the United States Ford Model Numbers for 85 hp V-8 equipped cars was Model 78 and 60 hp V-8 cars was Model 74. Models 81A and 82A in 1938, and Models 91A and 92A in 1939. 1940 Ford models: Eugene Gregorie, the first design chief of the Ford Motor Company made the 1940 Ford even prettier than the 1939 Ford. Styling highlights included sealed beam headlamps, a new horizontal bar grille and unique chevron taillights. The 1940 Ford fenders were beautifully curved to complement the body contours. In for 1940 was a popup cowl vent that provided interior ventilation instead of crank out window shields. Both Deluxe and Standard body styles had front vent windows. Inside the 40 Ford was a noticeably new dash that featured rectangle shaped instruments. 1940 was the last year for the Fords 60 horsepower V-8. The new 1940 Ford Convertible Coupe now had a hydraulically powered top. This new feature cost customers only $60.00. 23,704 1940 Convertible Coupes were produced at a $850.00. Eliminated from the 1940 Ford line up was a Convertible Sedan. Deluxe features included steering column mounted shift lever and parking light cast into the upper part of chrome head light trim rings. The Deluxe grille had horizontal bars and a side grille of painted horizontal bars in three sections. Chrome headlight trim rings had parking lights cast into upper portion. Also "Ford Deluxe" script on both sides of hood. 40 Ford Hubcaps were chrome with bright red "Ford Deluxe" lettering. Chrome trim rings were mounted on the rims of 16 inch tires. Standard features included a grille and hood very similar to 1939 Ford Deluxe models. Headlight and parking light trim rings were painted the same color as the body. The vertical grille bars were also painted to match body color. Parking lights on Standard body styles had a single chevron while Deluxe body styles had two. 1940 Ford Standard Model 02A equipped with the 60 horsepower engine came in 4 different body styles. Model 02A 1940 Ford body styles consisted of a Standard Coupe, Tudor Sedan, Fordor Sedan, Station Wagon and Business Coupe. All equipped with the 60 horsepower engine. Model 01A 1940 Ford body styles consisted of a Deluxe Convertible Coupe, Coupe, Tudor Sedan, Fordor Sedan, Station Wagon and a Business Coupe plus Standard Business Coupes, Coupes, Tudor Sedans, Fordor Sedans and Station Wagons. All equipped with the 85 horsepower engine. Prices range from $660.00 for Standard Coupe to $850.00 for a Deluxe Convertible Coupe. 1940 Ford Cars & New Improvements | Ford Motor Co. Promotional Film | ca. 1940 TBFA_0113 NOTE: THE VIDEO REPRESENTS HISTORY. SINCE IT WAS PRODUCED DECADES AGO, IT HAS HISTORICAL VALUES AND CAN BE CONSIDERED AS A VALUABLE HISTORICAL DOCUMENT. THE VIDEO HAS BEEN UPLOADED WITH EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES. ITS TOPIC IS REPRESENTED WITHIN HISTORICAL CONTEXT.
How to Protect Yourself from Nuclear Fallout and Survive an Atomic Attack - 1950s Educational Film
 
14:27
● Please SUPPORT my work on Patreon: https://bit.ly/2LT6opZ ● Visit my 2ND CHANNEL: https://bit.ly/2ILbyX8 ►Facebook: https://bit.ly/2INA7yt ►Twitter: https://bit.ly/2Lz57nY ►Google+: https://bit.ly/2IPz7dl ✚ Watch my "Atomic Age" PLAYLIST: https://bit.ly/2IQudNe The beautiful music for my intro was created by MusicalBasics. Listen to his music here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BC8RKY2qF9o It is an animated Cold War preparation short film about what Fallout is and how to protect yourself against it. While the information provided might actually be somewhat useful in case of a reactor accident (e.g. Fukushima), it is also fun to watch as the harms of nuclear fallout are smiled away by an animated person and the encouraging voice of a typical 50′s narrator. The original title of this film is "Fallout: When and How to Protect Yourself Against It". About fallout: Fallout (also fall-out) is the residual radioactive material propelled into the upper atmosphere following a nuclear blast or a nuclear reaction conducted in an unshielded facility, so called because it "falls out" of the sky after the explosion and shock wave have passed. It commonly refers to the radioactive dust and ash created when a nuclear weapon explodes, but this dust can also be originated in a damaged nuclear plant. Fallout can also refer to nuclear accidents, although a nuclear reactor does not explode like a nuclear weapon. This radioactive dust, consisting of material either directly vaporized by a nuclear blast or charged by exposure, is a highly dangerous kind of radioactive contamination. It can lead to the contamination of aquifers or soil and devastate the affected ecosystems years after the initial exposure. A wide range of biological changes may follow the irradiation of animals and humans. These vary from rapid death following high doses of penetrating whole-body radiation, to essentially normal lives for a variable period of time until the development of delayed radiation effects, in a portion of the exposed population, following low dose exposures. During the Cold War, the governments of the U.S., the USSR, Great Britain, and China attempted to educate their citizens about surviving a nuclear attack by providing procedures on minimizing short-term exposure to fallout. In the U.S. and China, this effort became known as Civil Defense. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuclear_fallout A fallout shelter is an enclosed space specially designed to protect occupants from radioactive debris or fallout resulting from a nuclear explosion. Many such shelters were constructed as civil defense measures during the Cold War. A fallout shelter is designed to allow its occupants to minimize exposure to harmful fallout until radioactivity has decayed to a safer level. Although many shelters still exist, some even being used as museums, virtually all fallout shelters have been decommissioned since the fall of the Soviet Union in 1991. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fallout_shelter Fallout: When and How to Protect Yourself Against It
Views: 477928 The Best Film Archives
Meet King Joe | 1949 | Cold War Era American Propaganda Cartoon
 
09:24
● Please SUPPORT my work on Patreon: https://bit.ly/2LT6opZ ● Visit my 2ND CHANNEL: https://bit.ly/2ILbyX8 ►Facebook: https://bit.ly/2INA7yt ►Twitter: https://bit.ly/2Lz57nY ►Google+: https://bit.ly/2IPz7dl ✚ Watch my "Old America" PLAYLIST: https://bit.ly/2rOHzmy This 1949 Technicolor cartoon is a Cold War-era propaganda film aimed at American workers with the objective of convincing them of their good fortune. It shows us the life of a common working man in America, and how he is able to achieve financial success for himself thanks to investment, competition, research, and technology. Joe, an average American working man who, wears overalls and talks with a pseudo-Brooklyn accent, is "king of the workers of the world" not because he is worthy, but because the machinery in his factory "multiplies strength and efficiency." We also learn that Joe is "king" not because he can exert power over anything, but because "he can buy more with his wages than any other worker on the globe." We gets a nicely illustrated introduction to then-standard basic economic theories of production and investment that "make the United States the industrial master of the world”. As proof that the American capitalist system is the most wonderful on earth, the narrator informs us that Americans own 72% of the cars in the world, 92% of the bathtubs, and "practically all the refrigerators in existence." The narrator sums up the attitude industrial America was pushing: "Labor and management must continue to increase the production of better goods at lower prices so that more people will be able to buy the things that make life easier and happier for all of us." The cartoon is a John Sutherland production. It is one of the "fun and facts about America" series, made "to create a deeper understanding of what has made America the finest place in the world to live." HISTORICAL BACKGROUND / CONTEXT The Cold War (1947-1991) was in many respects a struggle for the hearts and minds of people everywhere. That competition was carried out through massive American and Soviet propaganda campaigns to isolate the respective opponent internationally, win the approval of world opinion, and consolidate the own sphere of influence. Every opportunity from art exhibits to international sports events, and every medium from radio to television, was used to fight the propaganda war. During the Cold War, films functioned as a means to influence and control public opinion internally. The United States and the Soviet Union invested heavily in propaganda designed to influence the hearts and minds of people around the world, especially using motion pictures. Cold War films produced by both sides attempted to address different facets of the superpower conflict and sought to influence both domestic and foreign opinion. The gap between American and Soviet film gave the Americans a distinct advantage over the Soviet Union; America was readily prepared to utilize their cinematic achievements as a way to effectively impact the public opinion in a way the Soviet Union could not. Cinema, Americans hoped, would help close the gap caused by Soviet development of nuclear weapons and advancements in space technology. The use of film as an effective form of widespread propaganda transformed cinema into another Cold War battlefront. American films incorporated a wide scale of Cold War themes and issues into all genres of film, which gave American motion pictures a particular lead over Soviet film. Despite the audiences' lack of zeal for Anti-Communist/Cold War related cinema, the films produced evidently did serve as successful propaganda in both America and the USSR. The films released during this time received a response from the Soviet Union, which subsequently released its own array of films to combat the depiction of the Communist threat. Television and advertising played key roles in constructing the image of an ideal American way of life. American propaganda functioned to shore up support and national pride by projecting an image of prosperity, freedom and strength. In many ways, however, these images were fantasy. They contrasted and conflicted with many American's real life. Meet King Joe | 1949 | Cold War Era American Propaganda Cartoon TBFA_0093
Views: 151208 The Best Film Archives
FBI Training Film | Shooting for Survival | 1960s | Defensive Firearms Training
 
15:24
● Please SUPPORT my work on Patreon: https://bit.ly/2LT6opZ ● Visit my 2ND CHANNEL: https://bit.ly/2ILbyX8 ►Facebook: https://bit.ly/2INA7yt ►Twitter: https://bit.ly/2Lz57nY ►Google+: https://bit.ly/2IPz7dl ✚ Watch my "Old America" PLAYLIST: https://bit.ly/2rOHzmy Basic rule for survival against hostile fire is to take cover. Defensive firearms training that includes technical skills and target practice survival skills for law enforcement agents. Scenes of agents taking cover and scenes of target practice are shown throughout. HISTORICAL BACKGROUND / CONTEXT In 1934—a year after the Kansas City massacre that left four law enforcement officers dead, including a Bureau agent—Congress gave FBI agents the authority to carry firearms. In response, the FBI began a robust firearms training program, which has continuously grown and evolved through the years in order to keep pace with technology and best prepare agents and FBI police officers for the increasing dangers and threats they face while carrying out their assignments, domestically and internationally. Each year, U.S. law enforcement officers at the local, state, and federal level are killed or wounded in the line of duty. Even seemingly routine arrest warrant situations or domestic disturbance calls can turn deadly in an instant. Officers must develope the skills and mindset required to quickly identify and handle critical situations in high risk environments. The firearms training program of the FBI provides the agents and police officers the skills needed to safely and effectively use firearms, if necessary, while performing their duties. The FBI Academy (in Quantico, Virginia), dedicated to being the world’s premier law enforcement learning and research center and an advocate for law enforcement’s best practices worldwide, is operated by the Bureau’s Training Division. Since 1934, special agents have been authorized to carry firearms. As part of the preparation for potential deadly force encounters, all new agent trainees currently receive training with Bureau-issued pistol, carbine, and shotgun. The FBI’s basic law enforcement firearms training curriculum is grounded within the fundamentals of firearms marksmanship and includes instruction on firearms safety, the performance of basic weapon handling skills, and live fire training. In order to demonstrate proficiency, all trainees must successfully qualify with each weapon. Trainees, who must qualify with a pistol, carbine, and shotgun, fire approximately 5,000 rounds of ammunition during their firearms training. About the FBI The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is the domestic intelligence and security service of the United States, which simultaneously serves as the nation's prime Federal law enforcement organization. Operating under the jurisdiction of the U.S. Department of Justice, FBI is concurrently a member of the U.S. Intelligence Community and reports to both the Attorney General and the Director of National Intelligence. A lead U.S. counterterrorism, counterintelligence, and criminal investigative organization, FBI has jurisdiction over violations of more than 200 categories of federal crime. Unlike the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), which has no law enforcement authority and is focused on intelligence collection overseas, FBI is primarily a domestic agency, maintaining 56 field offices in major cities throughout the United States, and more than 400 resident agencies in lesser cities and areas across the nation. At an FBI field office, a senior-level FBI officer concurrently serves as the representative of the Director of National Intelligence. Despite its domestic focus, FBI also maintains a significant international footprint, operating 60 Legal Attache (LEGAT) offices and 15 sub-offices in U.S. embassies and consulates across the globe. FBI was established in 1908 as the Bureau of Investigation (BOI). Its name was changed to the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) in 1935. The FBI headquarters is the J. Edgar Hoover Building, located in Washington, D.C. FBI Training Film | Shooting for Survival | 1960s | Defensive Firearms Training NOTE: THE VIDEO DOCUMENTS HISTORICAL EVENTS. SINCE IT WAS PRODUCED DECADES AGO, IT HAS HISTORICAL VALUES AND CAN BE CONSIDERED AS A VALUABLE HISTORICAL DOCUMENT. THE VIDEO HAS BEEN UPLOADED WITH EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES. ITS TOPIC IS REPRESENTED WITHIN HISTORICAL CONTEXT. THE VIDEO DOES NOT CONTAIN SENSITIVE SCENES AT ALL!
Views: 50683 The Best Film Archives
Private Snafu - Booby Traps | 1944 | US Army Animated Training Film
 
04:19
● Please SUPPORT my work on Patreon: https://bit.ly/2LT6opZ ● Visit my 2ND CHANNEL: https://bit.ly/2ILbyX8 ►Facebook: https://bit.ly/2INA7yt ►Twitter: https://bit.ly/2Lz57nY ►Google+: https://bit.ly/2IPz7dl ✚ Watch my "WW2-Era Cartoons" PLAYLIST: https://bit.ly/2GRclQH Private Snafu is the title character of a series of black-and-white American instructional cartoon shorts, ironic and humorous in tone, that were produced between 1943 and 1945. Private Snafu demonstrated to the soldiers what not to do in service and designed to improve troop morale. The cartoons were produced to the US Army by Warner Bros. The voice of Private Snafu was performed by Mel Blanc. Read more about the Private Snafu series: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Private_Snafu Private Snafu - Booby Traps | 1944 | US Army Animated Training Film
Views: 117236 The Best Film Archives
Scrap Happy Daffy | World War 2 Era Propaganda Cartoon | 1943
 
08:00
● Please SUPPORT my work on Patreon: https://bit.ly/2LT6opZ ● Visit my 2ND CHANNEL: https://bit.ly/2ILbyX8 ►Facebook: https://bit.ly/2INA7yt ►Twitter: https://bit.ly/2Lz57nY ►Google+: https://bit.ly/2IPz7dl ✚ Watch my "WW2-Era Cartoons" PLAYLIST: https://bit.ly/2GRclQH Scrap Happy Daffy is a humorous Looney Tunes black and white cartoon featuring Daffy Duck, directed by Frank Tashlin and released in 1943 by Warner Bros. It was made during the Second World War to encourage Americans to donate scrap metal for the war effort. The short was the final appearance of Daffy Duck in black and white. Plot: Daffy is the guard of a scrap yard, doing his part to help America win the war against the Germans, but the enemy decide to destroy his scrap pile by sending a billy goat out to eat everything in sight. HISTORICAL BACKGROUND / CONTEXT During World War 2, Enemy conquests cut off supplies of crucial raw materials. The shortage of rubber was the most serious impediment to the Allied war effort, but metals of all kinds were needed in huge quantities. Building tanks, ships, planes, and other weapons required massive amounts of metals, more than any other military conflict in history. An M4 Sherman tank required more than 20 tons of metal. A Navy battleship needed more than 900 tons. And building the world's largest air force meant that aluminum would be needed in unprecedented quantities. Thus the government after Pearl Harbor either cut off the supply of metal to the consumer economy or strictly rationed it. Everything from barbed wire to farm equipment was rationed. Factories quickly shifted from manufacturing civilian goods to military material. The last automobile rolled off the assembly line on February 10, 1942, and cars wouldn’t be manufactured again until August 1945. On April 2, 1942, the government ordered a reduction in the use of metals in packaging of civilian products. Anyone who wanted to purchase a tin tube of toothpaste or shaving cream had to turn in the old tube first. On March 1, 1943, these restrictions resulted in the rationing of canned foods. Expanding mine production took time. And increasing imports meant that ships had to be built which also took time. But there was metal that was immediately available. One estimate suggests that 1.5 million tons of scrap metal lay useless on U.S. farms. And there were also large quantities in the cities as well. The government urged Americans to turn in scrap metal for recycling, and schools and community groups like the Boy Scouts across the country held scrap metal drives. Scrap drives and tin can drives reclaimed tons of metals, but not enough to prevent shortages. Drives were often great community events, with performers, and speeches. Even celebrities pitched in to help promote these events. Competitions were held to see which town, county, and state produced the most scrap, and the winners boasted of their feats. Citizens scoured their homes, farms, and businesses for metal. Housewives donated pots and pans, farmers turned in farm equipment, and children even gave up their metal toys. Many people removed bumpers and fenders from their cars and brought to the collection sites. Sometimes even historical statues were melted down. These drives had mixed results. While not all scrap materials proved useful, many did and provided a small but significant source of material. Most importantly, these drives galvanized the Home Front and made each individual, even children, feel like a crucial part of the war effort. Scrap Happy Daffy | World War 2 Era Propaganda Cartoon | 1943 TBFA_0155 (DM_0079) NOTE: THE VIDEO REPRESENTS HISTORY. SINCE IT WAS PRODUCED DECADES AGO, IT HAS HISTORICAL VALUES AND CAN BE CONSIDERED AS A VALUABLE HISTORICAL DOCUMENT. THE VIDEO HAS BEEN UPLOADED WITH EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES. ITS TOPIC IS REPRESENTED WITHIN HISTORICAL CONTEXT. THE VIDEO DOES NOT CONTAIN SENSITIVE SCENES AT ALL!
Views: 10825 The Best Film Archives
Anti-Communist Propaganda Cartoon | Make Mine Freedom | 1948
 
09:26
● Please SUPPORT my work on Patreon: https://bit.ly/2LT6opZ ● Visit my 2ND CHANNEL: https://bit.ly/2ILbyX8 ►Facebook: https://bit.ly/2INA7yt ►Twitter: https://bit.ly/2Lz57nY ►Google+: https://bit.ly/2IPz7dl ✚ Watch my "Old America" PLAYLIST: https://bit.ly/2rOHzmy This 1948 Cold War-era propaganda cartoon, entitled Make Mine Freedom, uses humor to promote democracy versus communism, and free enterprise (capitalism) over communism’s totalitarian governments. It contrasts mainstream American values with the values of Soviet communism. The point that this cartoon seems to be making, is beware of any individual, organization, or administration that attempts to escalate class warfare to divide the country and make socialism appear to be the only solution. We will always have our differences, but putting the government in charge of everything for promises that you will be taken care of, and surrendering your freedom is not the solution. The cartoon was produced by John Sutherland and sponsored by the Harding College. It is one of the "fun and facts about America" series, made "to create a deeper understanding of what has made America the finest place in the world to live." Plot: A traveling salesman called Dr. Utopia, selling bottles of "ISM" (communism), takes in four unsuspecting dopes who believe his promises about the powers of ISM to solve all their problems. They sample his wares, falling into a waking nightmare where they get a nasty taste of the lack of freedom they would face after relinquishing control over their factories and farms to the parent state. When a lone politician dares speak up, he is brainwashed and later shown with a phonograph for a head that plays "Everything is fine!" over and over. In the end, the character "John Q. Public" declaims about the way communists try to incite race hatred, class warfare, and religious intolerance, and the townspeople drive Dr. Utopia out of town, pelting him with bottles of ISM as he flees. HISTORICAL BACKGROUND / CONTEXT The Cold War (1947-1991) was in many respects a struggle for the hearts and minds of people everywhere. That competition was carried out through massive American and Soviet propaganda campaigns to isolate the respective opponent internationally, win the approval of world opinion, and consolidate the own sphere of influence. Every opportunity from art exhibits to international sports events, and every medium from radio to television, was used to fight the propaganda war. During the Cold War, films functioned as a means to influence and control public opinion internally. The United States and the Soviet Union invested heavily in propaganda designed to influence the hearts and minds of people around the world, especially using motion pictures. Cold War films produced by both sides attempted to address different facets of the superpower conflict and sought to influence both domestic and foreign opinion. The gap between American and Soviet film gave the Americans a distinct advantage over the Soviet Union; America was readily prepared to utilize their cinematic achievements as a way to effectively impact the public opinion in a way the Soviet Union could not. Cinema, Americans hoped, would help close the gap caused by Soviet development of nuclear weapons and advancements in space technology. The use of film as an effective form of widespread propaganda transformed cinema into another Cold War battlefront. American films incorporated a wide scale of Cold War themes and issues into all genres of film, which gave American motion pictures a particular lead over Soviet film. Despite the audiences' lack of zeal for Anti-Communist/Cold War related cinema, the films produced evidently did serve as successful propaganda in both America and the USSR. The films released during this time received a response from the Soviet Union, which subsequently released its own array of films to combat the depiction of the Communist threat. Television and advertising played key roles in constructing the image of an ideal American way of life. American propaganda functioned to shore up support and national pride by projecting an image of prosperity, freedom and strength. In many ways, however, these images were fantasy. They contrasted and conflicted with many American's real life. Anti-Communist Propaganda Cartoon | Make Mine Freedom | 1948 TBFA_0116 NOTE: THE VIDEO REPRESENTS HISTORY. SINCE IT WAS PRODUCED DECADES AGO, IT HAS HISTORICAL VALUES AND CAN BE CONSIDERED AS A VALUABLE HISTORICAL DOCUMENT. THE VIDEO HAS BEEN UPLOADED WITH EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES. ITS TOPIC IS REPRESENTED WITHIN HISTORICAL CONTEXT. THE VIDEO DOES NOT CONTAIN SENSITIVE SCENES AT ALL!
Views: 30392 The Best Film Archives
World War 2 Interrogation Techniques | Intelligence Gathering | WW2 Military Training Film | 1943
 
29:58
● Please SUPPORT my work on Patreon: https://bit.ly/2LT6opZ ● Visit my 2ND CHANNEL: https://bit.ly/2ILbyX8 ►Facebook: https://bit.ly/2INA7yt ►Twitter: https://bit.ly/2Lz57nY ►Google+: https://bit.ly/2IPz7dl ✚ Watch my "Military Training Films" PLAYLIST: https://bit.ly/2G6XIrN This 1943 U.S. Army Air Forces training film demonstrates psychological approaches, methods and interrogation techniques employed by air intelligence officers in extracting military information from captured enemy airmen during World War 2. The film shows interviews with captured German, Italian and Japanese pilots to illustrate the importance of pre-knowledge of the prisoner's history, culture, customs, ideology, superstitions and language. We can see how each interrogator's approach is modified for the typical national characteristics of captured pilots and aircrew, while still being aware of each individual's personality and how it could be exploited. The film emphasizes the importance of preparing for the interview by examining the intelligence reports and the prisoner's personal belongings. HISTORICAL BACKGROUND / CONTEXT Intelligence-gathering is by its very nature secretive. It involves putting together pieces of a puzzle that don’t always fit. In fact, it quite often involves putting together pieces of a puzzle that are not meant to fit. Sometimes the information is naive, other times deliberately misleading; sometimes the information is insufficient, other times so abundant it becomes contradictory. Perhaps most frustratingly of all, the intelligence officer never knows what the story is supposed to look like. He has only his instinct and training to predict just what it is exactly that the enemy is planning. But if intelligence is the meal, then interrogation is the after-meal drink. It is a world of shady characters with hazy experiences. The information gathered from a captured enemy is always suspect: how does the interrogator know when the prisoner is telling the truth? How does the interrogator know when the enemy is truly devoid of information? When he is spitting out half-truths? Even if he is sincere and forthright about his knowledge, is he correct? Is his information accurate? Interrogation is incurably untrustworthy-but it is still vital. There is an added degree of difficulty for the interrogator operating in wartime. He is forced to work with an additional sense of urgency he is unburdened with in a peaceful environment. He must supply his superior with the necessary information in a timely manner. His effectiveness can often quite literally mean the difference between life and death for his fellow soldiers-and he knows it. Quickly providing his military commander with clear and accurate information can-and indeed has-influenced the outcome of decisive battles. There are three classifications that methods used in interrogation fall into: psychological, physical and mental coercion, and torture. Psychological interrogation is completely legal under international law and is widely accepted and practiced in the international community. It refers to attempts to gather information by simply talking to the prisoner. The interrogator may outsmart and deceive the prisoner but there is never any physical contact involved and the prisoner is never in any pain. In the Atlantic Monthly last year, journalist Mark Bowden listed the methods involved in mental and physical coercion, a category that is informally referred to as ‘torture-lite’. “These include sleep deprivation, exposure to heat or cold, the use of drugs to cause confusion, rough treatment (slapping, shoving or shaking), forcing a prisoner to stand for days at a time or to sit in uncomfortable positions, and playing on fears of himself and his family”, he wrote. The distinction between torture and mental/physical coercion, Bowden felt, was that “although excruciating for the victim, these tactics generally leave no permanent marks and do no physical harm”. The Geneva Conventions, he added, make no such distinction. Both the 1929 Conventions and their expanded 1949 counterpart explicitly prohibit any type of interrogation more intense than the psychological approach outlined above. World War 2 Interrogation Techniques | Intelligence Gathering | WW2 Military Training Film | 1943 NOTE: THE VIDEO REPRESENTS HISTORY. SINCE IT WAS PRODUCED DECADES AGO, IT HAS HISTORICAL VALUES AND CAN BE CONSIDERED AS A VALUABLE HISTORICAL DOCUMENT. THE VIDEO HAS BEEN UPLOADED WITH EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES. ITS TOPIC IS REPRESENTED WITHIN HISTORICAL CONTEXT. THE VIDEO DOES NOT CONTAIN SENSITIVE SCENES AT ALL!
Views: 91440 The Best Film Archives
US Air Raid on the Japanese Held Truk Island | 1944 | World War 2 Newsreel
 
10:02
● Please SUPPORT my work on Patreon: https://bit.ly/2LT6opZ ● Visit my 2ND CHANNEL: https://bit.ly/2ILbyX8 ►Facebook: https://bit.ly/2INA7yt ►Twitter: https://bit.ly/2Lz57nY ►Google+: https://bit.ly/2IPz7dl ✚ Watch my "WW2 in the Pacific" PLAYLIST: https://bit.ly/2KUw6ZY Amazing vintage newsreel of an air raid as America takes the Truk Island (today Chuuk Island) from the Japanese on February 16-17, 1944. HISTORICAL BACKGROUND / CONTEXT Operation Hailstone was a massive naval air and surface raid launched on February 16–17, 1944, during World War 2 by the United States Navy against the Japanese naval and air base at Truk in the Caroline Islands. The Truk Island was a major Japanese logistical base as well as the operating "home" base for the Imperial Japanese Navy's Combined Fleet. Some have described it as the Japanese equivalent of the US Navy's Pearl Harbor. The Truk was the only major Japanese airbase within range of the Marshall Islands and was a significant source of support for Japanese garrisons located on islands and atolls throughout the central and south Pacific. The base was the key logistical and operational hub supporting Japan's perimeter defenses in the central and south Pacific. To ensure air and naval superiority for the upcoming invasion of Eniwetok U.S. Admiral Raymond Spruance ordered a raid on Truk. Vice Admiral Marc A. Mitscher's Task Force 58 had five fleet carriers (USS Enterprise, USS Yorktown, USS Essex, USS Intrepid, and USS Bunker Hill and four light carriers), embarking more than 500 planes. Supporting the carriers was a large fleet of seven battleships, and numerous cruisers, destroyers, submarines, and other support ships. Fearing that the base was becoming too vulnerable, the Japanese had relocated the aircraft carriers, battleships, and heavy cruisers of the Combined Fleet to Palau a week earlier. However, numerous smaller warships and merchant ships remained in and around the anchorage and several hundred aircraft were stationed at the island's airfields. Operation Hailstone involved a combination of air raids, surface ship actions, and submarine activities over two days and appeared to take the Japanese completely by surprise. During the two-day operation, the F6F Hellcat and P-47 Thunderbolt fighters raid on Japanese airfields, aircraft, shore installations, and ships in and around the Truk anchorage. A force of U.S. surface ships and submarines guarded possible exit routes from the island's harbor to catch any Japanese ships that tried to escape. Over 250 Japanese aircraft were eliminated, mostly on the ground. Many of the aircraft were in various states of assembly, having just arrived from Japan in disassembled form aboard cargo ships. Very few of the assembled aircraft were able to take off in response to the U.S. action. The U.S. lost twenty-five aircraft, mainly due to the intense anti-aircraft fire from Truk's defenses. The action for the most part ended Truk as a major threat to Allied operations in the central Pacific; the Japanese garrison on Eniwetok was denied any realistic hope of reinforcement and support during the invasion that began on February 18, 1944, greatly assisting U.S. forces in their conquest of that island. Truk was isolated by Allied (primarily U.S.) forces as they continued their advance towards Japan by invading other Pacific islands such as Guam, Saipan, Palau, and Iwo Jima. Today: The Truk Island (トラック諸島) today called Chuuk Island (チューク諸島). In 1969, William A. Brown and French oceanographer Jacques Cousteau and his team explored Truk Lagoon. Following Cousteau's 1971 television documentary about the lagoon and its ghostly remains, the place became a scuba diving paradise, drawing wreck diving enthusiasts from around the world to see its numerous, virtually intact sunken ships. The shipwrecks and remains are sometimes referred to as the "Ghost Fleet of Truk Lagoon". US Air Raid on the Japanese Held Truk Island | 1944 | World War 2 Newsreel NOTE: THE VIDEO DOCUMENTS HISTORICAL EVENTS. SINCE IT WAS PRODUCED DECADES AGO, IT HAS HISTORICAL VALUES AND CAN BE CONSIDERED AS A VALUABLE HISTORICAL DOCUMENT. THE VIDEO HAS BEEN UPLOADED WITH EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES. ITS TOPIC IS REPRESENTED WITHIN HISTORICAL CONTEXT. THE VIDEO DOES NOT CONTAIN SENSITIVE SCENES AT ALL!
Views: 246768 The Best Film Archives
World War 2 Paratrooper Training Film | Paratroops | ca. 1943
 
09:04
● Please SUPPORT my work on Patreon: https://bit.ly/2LT6opZ ● Visit my 2ND CHANNEL: https://bit.ly/2ILbyX8 ►Facebook: https://bit.ly/2INA7yt ►Twitter: https://bit.ly/2Lz57nY ►Google+: https://bit.ly/2IPz7dl ✚ Watch my "Military Training Films" PLAYLIST: https://bit.ly/2G6XIrN This video – originally titled as "Paratroops" – is a World War 2-era military training film produced by the U.S. Office of War Information. It was released in circa 1943. The film depicts the training of U.S. Army Paratroops. It shows details of how the airborne force is prepared for combat operations including a supplemental section on alpine training for ski paratroops. The soldiers learn to jump, fold and pack their parachute, fight, and ski. …SKI TRAINING??? Where EXACTLY were they thinking of going during that time? HISTORICAL BACKGROUND / CONTEXT Paratroopers are military parachutists – military personnel trained in parachuting into an operation and usually functioning as part of an airborne force. Military parachutists (troops) and parachutes were first used on a large scale during World War 2 for troop distribution and transportation. Paratroopers developed an elite image on both sides during the war. As World War 2 approached neither Britain nor America had paratrooper regiments. It was the Germans who seized on the potential that paratroopers gave. Such troops fitted in perfectly with Heinz Guderian’s vision of lightening war – Blitzkrieg. Hermann Göring, as head of the Luftwaffe, formed the first parachute regiments in 1935. A Luftwaffe general, Kurt Student, was given charge of airborne training. The first opposed German airborne attacks occurred in May1940, during the Norwegian Campaign, when Fallschirmjäger, the elite German paratrooper unit captured the defended air bases at Oslo and Stavanger. In the attack on the Netherlands, German paratroopers played a major role isolating the city of The Hague and in Belgium, they seized vital bridges and took a strategic fort at Eben Emael. One year later, in May 1941, the Germans used the Fallschirmjäger to invade Crete. This was the first time that paratroopers were given the task of attacking and defeating a complete target. At the time, it was the largest airborne operation in history. Though the island was taken after heavy fighting and Battle of Crete passed into military folklore, the Germans took very heavy casualties (25%) and Adolf Hitler lost faith in this form of attack. On the orders of Hitler, German paratroopers were sent to Russia where they fought as ground troops. However, the British read more into this battle and with the support of Winston Churchill, Britain soon had an airborne division. In the United States, an airborne brigade was discussed in 1939 by the Chief of Infantry. A parachute test platoon came into being in June 1940 under the control of the Infantry. This platoon was headed by Major William Lee. In the autumn of 1940, a parachute battalion was created in America and a parachute school was founded at Fort Benning in Georgia. The Americans, like the British, experimented with the use of gliders to deliver their men to a drop zone. Both Britain’s and America’s airborne divisions tended to total about 9,000 men. The tendency was to go for lightly armed men to boost their ability to move around a battlefield. This put them at a disadvantage on the ground if they were confronted by tanks and other armored vehicles. The damage down to the Germans in Crete taught a lesson to the British and Americans in that any area that was prepared for an airborne attack, would result in heavy losses for the attackers. Airborne soldiers at D-Day took disproportionately high casualties compared to the beach landings (with the exception of Omaha) while the airborne attack on Arnhem proved to be a failure. The success of the Allies in using parachute regiments to capture airstrips in Burma was only due to the involvement of ground forces as well as airborne troops. In Western Europe, the speed of the Allies advance was such that the time to plan and co-ordinate large scale airborne raid was never available. Most senior military commanders saw the role of the airborne troops simply as to seize strategic sites such as airfields or bridges, and to hold them until ground troops arrived. On many occasions, paratroopers were used as normal infantrymen. This happened in both the European theatre as well as in the Pacific. TBFA_0128 (DM_0068) World War 2 Paratrooper Training Film | Paratroops | ca. 1943 NOTE: THE VIDEO DOCUMENTS HISTORICAL EVENTS. SINCE IT WAS PRODUCED DECADES AGO, IT HAS HISTORICAL VALUES AND CAN BE CONSIDERED AS A VALUABLE HISTORICAL DOCUMENT. THE VIDEO HAS BEEN UPLOADED WITH EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES. ITS TOPIC IS REPRESENTED WITHIN HISTORICAL CONTEXT. THE VIDEO DOES NOT CONTAIN SENSITIVE SCENES AT ALL!
Views: 15093 The Best Film Archives
German Anti-Aircraft Gun System | Flak | US Air Force Training Film | 1944
 
16:40
● Please SUPPORT my work on Patreon: https://bit.ly/2LT6opZ ● Visit my 2ND CHANNEL: https://bit.ly/2ILbyX8 ►Facebook: https://bit.ly/2INA7yt ►Twitter: https://bit.ly/2Lz57nY ►Google+: https://bit.ly/2IPz7dl ✚ Watch my "Military Training Films" PLAYLIST: https://bit.ly/2G6XIrN FLAK is German acronym of Fliegerabwehrkanone / Flugabwehrkanone ‎(“aeroplane defence cannon”). This US Air Force training film (1944) provides an in-depth look at the German anti-aircraft gun (Flak) system, and highlight the evasive maneuvers utilized by US pilots during their missions. German Anti-Aircraft Gun System | Flak | US Air Force Training Film | 1944 TBFA_0019 (DM_0005) NOTE: THE VIDEO REPRESENTS HISTORICAL EVENTS. SINCE IT WAS PRODUCED DECADES AGO, IT HAS HISTORICAL VALUES AND CAN BE CONSIDERED AS A VALUABLE HISTORICAL DOCUMENT. THE VIDEO HAS BEEN UPLOADED WITH EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES. ITS TOPIC IS REPRESENTED WITHIN HISTORICAL CONTEXT. THE VIDEO DOES NOT CONTAIN SENSITIVE SCENES AT ALL!
Views: 783863 The Best Film Archives
Private Snafu - Home Front | 1943 | US Army Animated Training Film
 
04:25
● Please SUPPORT my work on Patreon: https://bit.ly/2LT6opZ ● Visit my 2ND CHANNEL: https://bit.ly/2ILbyX8 ►Facebook: https://bit.ly/2INA7yt ►Twitter: https://bit.ly/2Lz57nY ►Google+: https://bit.ly/2IPz7dl ✚ Watch my "WW2-Era Cartoons" PLAYLIST: https://bit.ly/2GRclQH Private Snafu is the title character of a series of black-and-white American instructional cartoon shorts, ironic and humorous in tone, that were produced between 1943 and 1945. Private Snafu demonstrated to the soldiers what not to do in service and designed to improve troop morale. The cartoons were produced to the US Army by Warner Bros. The voice of Private Snafu was performed by Mel Blanc. Read more about the Private Snafu series: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Private_Snafu TBFA_0042 (DM_0018)
The Thrifty Pig | 1941 | WW2 Era Cartoon
 
04:07
● Please SUPPORT my work on Patreon: https://bit.ly/2LT6opZ ● Visit my 2ND CHANNEL: https://bit.ly/2ILbyX8 ►Facebook: https://bit.ly/2INA7yt ►Twitter: https://bit.ly/2Lz57nY ►Google+: https://bit.ly/2IPz7dl ✚ Watch my "WW2-Era Cartoons" PLAYLIST: https://bit.ly/2GRclQH The Thrifty Pig is an educational short animated film released in 1941. Its aim was to educate the Canadians about war bonds during the World War 2. The Thrifty Pig features reused and reconfigured animation from Three Little Pigs (1933). Plot: Practical Pig, Fiddler Pig and Fifer Pig are three brothers who build their own houses with bricks, sticks and straw respectively. Practical Pig warns his brothers to build their house with "War Savings Certificate" bricks so that the house will be a solid defence against the marauding Wolf. Fifer and Fiddler ignore him and continue to play, singing "Who's Afraid of the Big Bad Wolf?". As they are singing, the Big Bad Wolf really comes by and blows Fifer's straw house down. Fifer manages to escape and hides at Fiddler's stick house but the Wolf also blows it down. The two pigs run and hide at Practical's brick house. The Wolf then tries to blow down the strong brick house, but is unable to make much progress as the bricks have made a strong foundation. Finally, Practical Pig chases the wolf away. The three pigs then sing "Who's Afraid of the Big Bad Wolf?" but with the caution that their house has to be in order to keep the wolf away. At the end of the cartoon an aircraft shooting out the message, "Invest in Victory". Other messages show the importance of spending less, and lending savings to hepl your country.
Views: 590327 The Best Film Archives
Kennedy Announces Blockade of Cuba During the Missile Crisis | 1962 | Cold War Era Newsreel
 
03:09
● Please SUPPORT my work on Patreon: https://bit.ly/2LT6opZ ● Visit my 2ND CHANNEL: https://bit.ly/2ILbyX8 ►Facebook: https://bit.ly/2INA7yt ►Twitter: https://bit.ly/2Lz57nY ►Google+: https://bit.ly/2IPz7dl ✚ Watch my "Cold War-Era" PLAYLIST: https://bit.ly/2J4N5LM In a dramatic televised speech to the American public on October 22, 1962, President John F. Kennedy announced that the Soviet Union has placed nuclear weapons in Cuba and, in response, the United States will establish a naval blockade around the island to prevent any other offensive weapons from entering Castro’s state. Kennedy also warned the Soviets that any nuclear attack from Cuba would be considered an act of war, and that the United States would retaliate in kind. HISTORICAL BACKGROUND / CONTEXT The Cuban Missile Crisis, also known as the October Crisis (Spanish: Crisis de octubre), the Caribbean Crisis (Russian: Карибский кризис), or the Missile Scare, was a 13-day (October 16–28, 1962) confrontation between the United States and the Soviet Union concerning American ballistic missile deployment in Italy and Turkey with consequent Soviet ballistic missile deployment in Cuba. Along with being televised worldwide, it was the closest the Cold War came to escalating into a full-scale nuclear war. In response to the failed Bay of Pigs Invasion of 1961, and the presence of American Jupiter ballistic missiles in Italy and Turkey, Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev decided to agree to Cuba's request to place nuclear missiles in Cuba to deter future harassment of Cuba. An agreement was reached during a secret meeting between Khrushchev and Fidel Castro in July 1962 and construction of a number of missile launch facilities started later that summer. The 1962 midterm elections were under way in the United States and the White House had denied charges that it was ignoring dangerous Soviet missiles 90 miles from Florida. These missile preparations were confirmed when an Air Force U-2 spy plane produced clear photographic evidence of medium-range (SS-4) and intermediate-range (R-14) ballistic missile facilities. The United States established a military blockade to prevent further missiles from entering Cuba. It announced that they would not permit offensive weapons to be delivered to Cuba and demanded that the weapons already in Cuba be dismantled and returned to the USSR. After a long period of tense negotiations, an agreement was reached between President John F. Kennedy and Khrushchev. Publicly, the Soviets would dismantle their offensive weapons in Cuba and return them to the Soviet Union, subject to United Nations verification, in exchange for a U.S. public declaration and agreement never to invade Cuba again without direct provocation. Secretly, the United States also agreed that it would dismantle all U.S.-built Jupiter medium-range ballistic missiles, which were deployed in Turkey and Italy against the Soviet Union but were not known to the public. When all offensive missiles and Ilyushin Il-28 light bombers had been withdrawn from Cuba, the blockade was formally ended on November 20, 1962. The negotiations between the United States and the Soviet Union pointed out the necessity of a quick, clear, and direct communication line between Washington and Moscow. As a result, the Moscow–Washington hotline was established. A series of agreements sharply reduced U.S.–Soviet tensions during the following years. The Cuban Missile Crisis seemed at the time a clear victory for the United States, but Cuba emerged from the episode with a much greater sense of security. The removal of antiquated Jupiter missiles from Turkey and Italy had no detrimental effect on U.S. nuclear strategy, but the Cuban Missile Crisis convinced a humiliated USSR to commence a massive nuclear buildup. In the 1970s, the Soviet Union reached nuclear parity with the United States and built intercontinental ballistic missiles capable of striking any city in the United States. A succession of U.S. administrations honored Kennedy’s pledge not to invade Cuba, and relations with the communist island nation situated just 80 miles from Florida remained a thorn in the side of U.S. foreign policy for more than 50 years. In 2015, officials from both nations announced the formal normalization of relations between the U.S and Cuba, which included the easing of travel restrictions and the opening of embassies and diplomatic missions in both countries. Kennedy Announces Blockade of Cuba During the Missile Crisis | 1962 | Cold War Era Newsreel TBFA_0078
Attack on Pearl Harbor | WW2 Japanese Newsreel in English | 1941
 
03:43
● Please SUPPORT my work on Patreon: https://bit.ly/2LT6opZ ● Visit my 2ND CHANNEL: https://bit.ly/2ILbyX8 ►Facebook: https://bit.ly/2INA7yt ►Twitter: https://bit.ly/2Lz57nY ►Google+: https://bit.ly/2IPz7dl ✚ Watch my "WW2 in the Pacific" PLAYLIST: https://bit.ly/2KUw6ZY This film is a Japanese (English-language) newsreel of the surprise attack on U.S. Navy Pacific fleet at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on December 7, 1941 (December 8 in Japan) from the Japanese perspective. It is a Japanese propaganda product and celebrates Japan's victory over America. The attack came as a profound shock to the American people and led directly to the American entry into World War 2. HISTORICAL BACKGROUND / CONTEXT The attack on Pearl Harbor, also known as the Battle of Pearl Harbor, the Hawaii Operation or Operation AI by the Japanese Imperial General Headquarters, and Operation Z during planning, was a surprise military strike by the Imperial Japanese Navy Air Service against the United States naval base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii Territory, on the morning of December 7, 1941. The attack led to the United States' entry into World War 2. Japan intended the attack as a preventive action to keep the U.S. Pacific Fleet from interfering with military actions they planned in Southeast Asia against overseas territories of the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, and the United States. Over the next seven hours there were coordinated Japanese attacks on the U.S.-held Philippines, Guam and Wake Island and on the British Empire in Malaya, Singapore, and Hong Kong. The attack commenced at 7:48 a.m. Hawaiian Time. The base was attacked by 353 Imperial Japanese fighter planes, bombers, and torpedo planes in two waves, launched from six aircraft carriers. All eight U.S. Navy battleships were damaged, with four sunk. All but the USS Arizona were later raised, and six were returned to service and went on to fight in the war. The Japanese also sank or damaged three cruisers, three destroyers, an anti-aircraft training ship, and one minelayer. 188 U.S. aircraft were destroyed; 2,403 Americans were killed and 1,178 others were wounded. Important base installations such as the power station, shipyard, maintenance, and fuel and torpedo storage facilities, as well as the submarine piers and headquarters building (also home of the intelligence section) were not attacked. Japanese losses were light: 29 aircraft and five midget submarines lost, and 64 servicemen killed. One Japanese sailor, Kazuo Sakamaki, was captured. The undeclared assault came as a profound shock to the American people and led directly to the American entry into World War 2 in both the Pacific and European theaters. The following day, December 8, the United States declared war on Japan. Domestic support for non-interventionism, which had been fading since the Fall of France in 1940, disappeared. Clandestine support of the United Kingdom (e.g., the Neutrality Patrol) was replaced by active alliance. Subsequent operations by the U.S. prompted Germany and Italy to declare war on the U.S. on December 11, which was reciprocated by the U.S. the same day. There were numerous historical precedents for unannounced military action by Japan. However, the lack of any formal warning, particularly while negotiations were still apparently ongoing, led President Franklin D. Roosevelt to proclaim December 7, 1941, "a date which will live in infamy". Because the attack happened without a declaration of war and without explicit warning, the attack on Pearl Harbor was judged by the Tokyo Trials to be a war crime. Attack on Pearl Harbor | WW2 Japanese Newsreel in English | 1941 TBFA_0090 (DM_0048)
Views: 33241 The Best Film Archives
Food Preservation: History of Canning | Vintage Documentary | ca. 1957
 
13:02
● Please SUPPORT my work on Patreon: https://bit.ly/2LT6opZ ● Visit my 2ND CHANNEL: https://bit.ly/2ILbyX8 ►Facebook: https://bit.ly/2INA7yt ►Twitter: https://bit.ly/2Lz57nY ►Google+: https://bit.ly/2IPz7dl ✚ Watch my "Old America" PLAYLIST: https://bit.ly/2rOHzmy This short film – originally titled as "The Three Squares" – is a vintage documentary produced by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. It was released in circa 1957. The film explains the importance of food preservation, the history of canning and the values of canned foods. The original title of the film refers to the "three square meals a day" ( breakfast, lunch, and dinner). HISTORICAL BACKGROUND / CONTEXT Canning is a method of preserving food in which the food contents are processed and sealed in an airtight container. Canning provides a shelf life typically ranging from one to five years, although under specific circumstances it can be much longer. A freeze-dried canned product, such as canned dried lentils, could last as long as 30 years in an edible state. In 1974, samples of canned food from the wreck of the Bertrand, a steamboat that sank in the Missouri River in 1865, were tested by the National Food Processors Association. Although appearance, smell and vitamin content had deteriorated, there was no trace of microbial growth and the 109-year-old food was determined to be still safe to eat. French origins: During the first years of the Napoleonic Wars, the French government offered a hefty cash award of 12,000 francs to any inventor who could devise a cheap and effective method of preserving large amounts of food. The larger armies of the period required increased and regular supplies of quality food. Limited food availability was among the factors limiting military campaigns to the summer and autumn months. In 1809, Nicolas Appert, a French confectioner and brewer, observed that food cooked inside a jar did not spoil unless the seals leaked, and developed a method of sealing food in glass jars. Appert was awarded the prize in 1810. The reason for lack of spoilage was unknown at the time, since it would be another 50 years before Louis Pasteur demonstrated the role of microbes in food spoilage. The French Army began experimenting with issuing canned foods to its soldiers, but the slow process of canning foods and the even slower development and transport stages prevented the army from shipping large amounts across the French Empire, and the war ended before the process was perfected. Following the end of the Napoleonic Wars, the canning process was gradually employed in other European countries and in the US. In the United States: Canned food also began to spread beyond Europe – Robert Ayars established the first American canning factory in New York City in 1812, using improved tin-plated wrought-iron cans for preserving oysters, meats, fruits and vegetables. Demand for canned food greatly increased during wars. Large-scale wars in the nineteenth century introduced increasing numbers of working-class men to canned food, and allowed canning companies to expand their businesses to meet military demands for non-perishable food, allowing companies to manufacture in bulk and sell to wider civilian markets after wars ended. Urban populations in Victorian Britain demanded ever-increasing quantities of cheap, varied, quality food that they could keep at home without having to go shopping daily. In response, companies such as Underwood, Nestlé, Heinz, and others provided quality canned food for sale to working class city-dwellers. The late 19th century saw the range of canned food available to urban populations greatly increase, as canners competed with each other using novel foodstuffs, highly decorated printed labels, and lower prices. Nutritional value: A 1997 study found that canned fruits and vegetables are as rich with dietary fiber and vitamins as the same corresponding fresh or frozen foods, and in some cases the canned products are richer than their fresh or frozen counterparts. The heating process during canning appears to make dietary fiber more soluble, and therefore more readily fermented in the colon into gases and physiologically active byproducts. Canned tomatoes have a higher available lycopene content. Consequently, canned meat and vegetables are often among the list of food items that are stocked during emergencies. Food Preservation: History of Canning | Vintage Documentary | ca. 1957 TBFA_0121 NOTE: THE VIDEO REPRESENTS HISTORY. SINCE IT WAS PRODUCED DECADES AGO, IT HAS HISTORICAL VALUES AND CAN BE CONSIDERED AS A VALUABLE HISTORICAL DOCUMENT. THE VIDEO HAS BEEN UPLOADED WITH EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES. ITS TOPIC IS REPRESENTED WITHIN HISTORICAL CONTEXT. THE VIDEO DOES NOT CONTAIN SENSITIVE SCENES AT ALL!
Views: 26532 The Best Film Archives
WW2 Tank Crew Training Film | Security on the March | 1943
 
23:59
● Please SUPPORT my work on Patreon: https://bit.ly/2LT6opZ ● Visit my 2ND CHANNEL: https://bit.ly/2ILbyX8 ►Facebook: https://bit.ly/2INA7yt ►Twitter: https://bit.ly/2Lz57nY ►Google+: https://bit.ly/2IPz7dl ✚ Watch my "Military Training Films" PLAYLIST: https://bit.ly/2G6XIrN It is a 1943 U.S. Army training film. It shows us how a WW2 Sherman tank unit prepared for an attack on march. The film covers night movement, camouflage when stopped and gives tips on being stealthier in your tank; it also covers how to use the columns firepower if attacked from the air. It emphasizes the importance of security on the battlefield: "Security means taking every precaution you can to keep yourself from getting knocked out of the scrap..." The tanks used in the film were all early M4A1 Shermans, but not super early since they are not DV tanks, but still have shorty gun mantlet and no telescopic sites, they do have heavy duty suspension as well. The tanks also have full turret baskets, with the 12 unprotected ready rounds, and no armor over the sponson ammo racks or the turret cheek add-on armor. Its possible training tanks did not have these features removed like tanks slated to see combat, or the film was made very early in the war. The main reason the film is interesting is the look at prewar combat, or pre air superiority march doctrine. The attention paid to defense from air attack would not be pushed nearly as much even by the Italian campaign and would be almost an afterthought by Normandy. Later films probably pushed very carefully searching for well concealed AT guns and infantry that the lead and flank scouts may have missed. It is also interesting how preparation for gas attacks is first thing they cover. I’m sure shortly after most unit got in combat they ended up losing or discarding most gas related gear, and I can’t ever recall seeing a man carrying a gas mask case or a square of the gas detecting paint on any vehicles in combat photos. HISTORICAL BACKGROUND / CONTEXT Tanks were an important weapons system in World War 2. Although tanks were the subject of widespread research in the inter-war years, production was limited to relatively small numbers in a few countries. However, during World War 2 most armies employed tanks, and production levels reached thousands each month. Prior to the entry of the United States into the war after the attack on Pearl Harbor in December 1941, the Army had only a few tanks. On military exercises, the U.S. Army used trucks with the word "tank" painted on their side. Even after Pearl Harbor the 10th Armored Division did not have any tanks, so crews trained by marching down roads in groups and executing orders as if they were in tanks. The most important American design of the war was the M4 Sherman medium tank. The M4 became the second-most-produced tank of World War 2, and was the only tank to be used by virtually all Allied forces (thanks to the American lend-lease program); approximately 40,000 M4 Shermans were produced during the war. M4s formed the main tank of American, British, Canadian, French, Polish and Chinese units. The M4 was the equal of the German medium tanks, the Panzer III and Panzer IV, at the time it first saw service in 1942. The Red Army was supplied with about 4,000 M4s. The M4, although reliable and easy to maintain, was already outgunned by the time the US encountered the up-gunned and up-armored German medium tanks in Italy and Northern Europe (the Panzer IV and various German self-propelled guns) and by late 1943 the arrival of German Panther and Tiger I were even graver threats due to the range, accuracy and penetrating power of their main guns. The Sherman suffered from thin armor and poor ammunition storage. Flawed United States armor doctrine played a major role in keeping the M4 undergunned in 1944–1945. This doctrine emphasized that tanks were to be used primarily for infantry support and exploitation, while the role of fighting enemy tanks was to be carried out by the tank destroyer branch. By the time of the Normandy campaign, the M4 had become the workhorse tank of the Allied forces. Some Shermans were equipped with the Duplex Drive system (Sherman DD), which allowed them to swim. Along with this were the M4 Dozer (a Sherman with a bulldozer blade), the T34 Calliope (mounting a multiple rocket launcher above the turret), the M4A3R3 Flame thrower (flame tank), and the Sherman Crab Mark I (a Sherman with a mine flail), as well as many other variants. WW2 Tank Crew Training Film | Security on the March | 1943 TBFA_0105 (DM_0056) NOTE: THE VIDEO REPRESENTS HISTORY. SINCE IT WAS PRODUCED DECADES AGO, IT HAS HISTORICAL VALUES AND CAN BE CONSIDERED AS A VALUABLE HISTORICAL DOCUMENT. THE VIDEO HAS BEEN UPLOADED WITH EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES. ITS TOPIC IS REPRESENTED WITHIN HISTORICAL CONTEXT. THE VIDEO DOES NOT CONTAIN SENSITIVE SCENES AT ALL!
Views: 27651 The Best Film Archives
Redwood Logging | 1946 | Documentary on the Giant Redwood Lumber Industry in California
 
10:57
● Please SUPPORT my work on Patreon: https://bit.ly/2LT6opZ ● Visit my 2ND CHANNEL: https://bit.ly/2ILbyX8 ►Facebook: https://bit.ly/2INA7yt ►Twitter: https://bit.ly/2Lz57nY ►Google+: https://bit.ly/2IPz7dl ✚ Watch my "Old America" PLAYLIST: https://bit.ly/2rOHzmy This documentary shows us the cutting, loading, transportation, mill sawing and finishing operations of the Northern California's redwood lumber industry in the 1940s. Redwood Logging | 1946 | Documentary on the Giant Redwood Lumber Industry in California NOTE: SINCE THE VIDOE WAS PRODUCED DECADES AGO, IT HAS HISTORICAL VALUES AND CAN BE CONSIDERED AS A VALUABLE HISTORICAL DOCUMENT. THE VIDEO HAS BEEN UPLOADED WITH EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES. ITS TOPIC IS REPRESENTED WITHIN HISTORICAL CONTEXT. THE VIDEO DOES NOT CONTAIN SENSITIVE SCENES AT ALL!
Views: 795622 The Best Film Archives
Denmark in World War 2 | The Danish Resistance | Documentary Short | 1944
 
10:05
● Please SUPPORT my work on Patreon: https://bit.ly/2LT6opZ ● Visit my 2ND CHANNEL: https://bit.ly/2ILbyX8 ►Facebook: https://bit.ly/2INA7yt ►Twitter: https://bit.ly/2Lz57nY ►Google+: https://bit.ly/2IPz7dl ✚ Watch my "WW2 in Europe" PLAYLIST: https://bit.ly/2HEkWHl This World War 2 era short film – originally titled as "Denmark Fights for Freedom" – documents the struggle of the Danish resistance movement against their German occupiers during the period 1943-1944. It was released in 1944. According to the statement in the intro, the scenes were surreptitiously shot "under the most dangerous conditions and smuggled out of the country" during the German occupation. It is a dramatic story of how a spirited nation pulled together to fight oppression through acts of sabotage and mass civil disobedience. Inspirational! HISTORICAL BACKGROUND / CONTEXT Denmark in World War 2: During most of World War 2, Denmark was first a protectorate, then an occupied territory under Germany. The decision to invade Denmark was taken in Berlin on 17 December 1939. On 9 April 1940, Germany invaded Denmark in Operation Weserübung and established a de facto protectorate over the country. On 29 August 1943 Germany placed Denmark under direct military occupation, which lasted until the Allied victory on 5 May 1945. Contrary to the situation in other countries under German occupation, most Danish institutions continued to function relatively normally until 1945. Both the Danish government and King Christian X remained in the country in an uneasy relationship between a democratic and a totalitarian system until the Danish government stepped down in a protest against the German demands to institute the death penalty for sabotage. Danish resistance movement: The Danish resistance movement (Danish: Modstandsbevægelsen) was an underground insurgency to resist the German occupation of Denmark during World War 2. Due to the initially lenient arrangements, in which the German occupation authority allowed the democratic government to stay in power, the resistance movement was slower to develop effective tactics on a wide scale than in some other countries. By 1943, many Danes were involved in underground activities, ranging from producing illegal publications to spying and sabotage. Major groups included the communist BOPA (Danish: Borgerlige Partisaner, Civil Partisans) and Holger Danske, both based in Copenhagen. Resistance agents eliminated an estimated 400 Danish collaborators and informers until 1944. In the postwar period, the Resistance was supported by politicians within Denmark and there was little effort to closely examine the killings. Studies were made in the late 20th and early 21st centuries, and people learned that there was sometimes improvised and contingent decision-making about the targets, with some morally ambiguous choices. Several important books and films have been produced on this topic. Denmark in World War 2 | The Danish Resistance | Documentary Short | 1944 TBFA_0146 (DM_0075) NOTE: THE VIDEO DOCUMENTS HISTORICAL EVENTS. SINCE IT WAS PRODUCED DECADES AGO, IT HAS HISTORICAL VALUES AND CAN BE CONSIDERED AS A VALUABLE HISTORICAL DOCUMENT. THE VIDEO HAS BEEN UPLOADED WITH EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES. ITS TOPIC IS REPRESENTED WITHIN HISTORICAL CONTEXT. THE VIDEO DOES NOT CONTAIN SENSITIVE SCENES AT ALL!
Views: 13338 The Best Film Archives
How Did U.S.S. Franklin Survive the Pacific Hell | World War 2 in Color | US Navy Documentary | 1945
 
24:04
● Please SUPPORT my work on Patreon: https://bit.ly/2LT6opZ ● Visit my 2ND CHANNEL: https://bit.ly/2ILbyX8 ►Facebook: https://bit.ly/2INA7yt ►Twitter: https://bit.ly/2Lz57nY ►Google+: https://bit.ly/2IPz7dl ✚ Watch my "WW2 in the Pacific" PLAYLIST: https://bit.ly/2KUw6ZY It is a 1945 U.S. Navy documentary film about the epic story of the aircraft carrier U.S.S. Franklin. The whole film was shot in color! Historical Background / Context: The USS Franklin (CV-13), nicknamed "Big Ben," was one of 24 Essex-class aircraft carriers built during World War 2 for the United States Navy, and the fifth US Navy ship to bear the name. Commissioned in January 1944, she served in several campaigns in the Pacific War, earning four battle stars. She was badly damaged by a Japanese air raid in March 1945, with the loss of over 800 of her crew, becoming the most heavily damaged United States carrier to survive the war. (Movie footage of the actual attack was included in the 1949 film Task Force starring Gary Cooper.) During combat the USS Franklin was struck by two armor piercing bombs dropped by a Japanese Zero aircraft. At least one penetrated the flight deck, setting off a series of explosions that crippled the ship. Despite terrible fires, the crew managed to hold on and fought desperately to keep the ship afloat. The USS Santa Fe (CL-60) aided the ship and provided fire suppression. Eventually the ship was saved, towed to Pearl Harbor by the USS Pittsburgh (CA-72) and returned to New York harbor under its own power. The USS Franklin was under repair during the rest of the war. She was decommissioned in 1947. While in reserve, she was reclassified as an attack carrier (CVA), then an antisubmarine carrier (CVS), and finally an aircraft transport (AVT), but was never modernized and never saw active service again. She was sold for scrap in 1966. How Did U.S.S. Franklin Survive the Pacific Hell | World War 2 in Color | US Navy Documentary | 1945 TBFA_0066 (DM_0032) NOTE: THE VIDEO DOCUMENTS HISTORICAL EVENTS. SINCE IT WAS PRODUCED DECADES AGO, IT HAS HISTORICAL VALUES AND CAN BE CONSIDERED AS A VALUABLE HISTORICAL DOCUMENT. THE VIDEO HAS BEEN UPLOADED WITH EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES. ITS TOPIC IS REPRESENTED WITHIN HISTORICAL CONTEXT. THE VIDEO DOES NOT CONTAIN SENSITIVE SCENES AT ALL!
Views: 29384 The Best Film Archives
How Stock Market Works | Investing Basics | Animated Short Film | 1957
 
11:22
● Please SUPPORT my work on Patreon: https://bit.ly/2LT6opZ ● Visit my 2ND CHANNEL: https://bit.ly/2ILbyX8 ►Facebook: https://bit.ly/2INA7yt ►Twitter: https://bit.ly/2Lz57nY ►Google+: https://bit.ly/2IPz7dl ✚ Watch my "Old America" PLAYLIST: https://bit.ly/2rOHzmy Animated short film (1957) explains how the American stock market works. Story: Mr. Finchley has just gotten a 60 dollar raise and wants to figure out the best way to invest it. * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * A stock market or equity market is the aggregation of buyers and sellers (a loose network of economic transactions, not a physical facility or discrete entity) of stocks (also called shares); these may include securities listed on a stock exchange as well as those only traded privately. A stock exchange is an exchange or stock market where stock brokers and traders can buy and/or sell stocks (also called shares), bonds, and other securities. Stock exchanges may also provide facilities for issue and redemption of securities and other financial instruments, and capital events including the payment of income and dividends. Securities traded on a stock exchange include stock issued by listed companies, unit trusts, derivatives, pooled investment products and bonds. Stock exchanges often function as "continuous auction" markets, with buyers and sellers consummating transactions at a central location, such as the floor of the exchange. To be able to trade a security on a certain stock exchange, it must be listed there. Usually, there is a central location at least for record keeping, but trade is increasingly less linked to such a physical place, as modern markets use electronic networks, which gives them advantages of increased speed and reduced cost of transactions. Trade on an exchange is restricted to brokers who are members of the exchange. In recent years, various other trading venues, such as electronic communication networks, alternative trading systems and "dark pools" have taken much of the trading activity away from traditional stock exchanges. The initial public offering of stocks and bonds to investors is by definition done in the primary market and subsequent trading is done in the secondary market. A stock exchange is often the most important component of a stock market. Supply and demand in stock markets are driven by various factors that, as in all free markets, affect the price of stocks. There is usually no obligation for stock to be issued via the stock exchange itself, nor must stock be subsequently traded on the exchange. Such trading may be off exchange or over-the-counter. This is the usual way that derivatives and bonds are traded. Increasingly, stock exchanges are part of a global securities market. The New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), sometimes known as the "Big Board", is an American stock exchange located at 11 Wall Street, Lower Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States. It is by far the world's largest stock exchange by market capitalization of its listed companies at US$19.69 trillion as of May 2015. How Stock Market Works | Investing Basics | Animated Short Film | 1957 TBFA_0018
Views: 21811 The Best Film Archives
Tokio Jokio | 1943 | World War 2 Era Propaganda Cartoon
 
07:09
● Please SUPPORT my work on Patreon: https://bit.ly/2LT6opZ ● Visit my 2ND CHANNEL: https://bit.ly/2ILbyX8 ►Facebook: https://bit.ly/2INA7yt ►Twitter: https://bit.ly/2Lz57nY ►Google+: https://bit.ly/2IPz7dl ✚ Watch my "WW2-Era Cartoons" PLAYLIST: https://bit.ly/2GRclQH Tokio Jokio is a 1943 comic Looney Tunes cartoon, an animated short film produced by Warner Bros. It was intended as an American propaganda film against Japan while the two countries were at war. As with most of the Looney Tunes shorts produced during World War 2, the film consists of a series of rapid-fire, short gag vignettes. The opening scene features a voice-over explaining that the short is merely a Japanese newsreel that was "captured from the enemy". The theme is on Japanese propaganda. Although the jokes are generally aimed at Japan, the cartoon also pokes fun at Rudolph Hess, Adolf Hitler and Benito Mussolini. Since the United States was at war and fought for survival - the stereotypes in the film were intended to give audiences some sense of superiority and optimism. All of the voices in the cartoon were performed by Mel Blanc. (Mel Blanc earned the nickname "The Man of a Thousand Voices". He is best remembered for his work as the voices of Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, Porky Pig, Tweety Bird, Sylvester the Cat, and many other Looney Tunes characters.) HISTORICAL BACKGROUND / CONTEXT On the morning of December 7, 1941, the Imperial Japanese Navy launched a surprise attack on the United States naval base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, that severely damaged the American Pacific fleet. The attack came as a profound shock to the American people and led directly to the American entry into World War II in both the Pacific and European theaters. Domestic support for non-interventionism disappeared. Clandestine support of the United Kingdom was replaced by active alliance. The following day, December 8, the United States declared war on the Empire of Japan. The lack of any formal warning, particularly while negotiations were still apparently ongoing, led President Franklin D. Roosevelt to proclaim December 7, 1941, "a date which will live in infamy". Because the attack happened without a declaration of war and without explicit warning, the attack on Pearl Harbor was judged by the Tokyo Trials to be a war crime after the end of World War 2. On December 11, Germany and Italy, honoring their commitments under the Tripartite Pact, declared war on the United States. The pact was an earlier agreement between Germany, Italy and Japan which had the principal objective of limiting U.S. intervention in any conflicts involving the three nations. The United States Congress issued a declaration of war against Germany and Italy later that same day. The United Kingdom actually declared war on Japan nine hours before the U.S. did, partially due to Japanese attacks on Malaya, Singapore and Hong Kong, and partially due to Winston Churchill's promise to declare war "within the hour" of a Japanese attack on the United States. Throughout the war, Pearl Harbor was frequently used in American propaganda. One further consequence of the attack on Pearl Harbor and its aftermath (notably the Niihau Incident) was that Japanese American residents and citizens were relocated to nearby Japanese-American internment camps. Within hours of the attack, hundreds of Japanese American leaders were rounded up and brought to high-security camps such as Sand Island at the mouth of Honolulu harbor and Kilauea Military Camp on the island of Hawaii. Later, over 110,000 Japanese Americans, including United States citizens, were removed from their homes and transferred to internment camps in California, Idaho, Utah, Arizona, Wyoming, Colorado, New Mexico, Arkansas, and Texas. The war on the Pacific against the Empire of Japan culminated in the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki by the United States Army Air Forces, accompanied by the Soviet invasion of Manchuria on 8 August 1945, resulting in the Japanese announcement of intent to surrender on 15 August 1945. The formal and official surrender of Japan took place aboard the battleship USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay on 2 September 1945. Tokio Jokio | 1943 | World War 2 Era Propaganda Cartoon TBFA_0077 (DM_0039)
Views: 985812 The Best Film Archives
Korean War - Battle of Inchon | 1950 | Fight for Seoul | US Invasion of the Korean Peninsula
 
18:01
● Please SUPPORT my work on Patreon: https://bit.ly/2LT6opZ ● Visit my 2ND CHANNEL: https://bit.ly/2ILbyX8 ►Facebook: https://bit.ly/2INA7yt ►Twitter: https://bit.ly/2Lz57nY ►Google+: https://bit.ly/2IPz7dl ✚ Watch my "History of Korea" PLAYLIST: https://bit.ly/2rluLmC It is a documentary on the activities of the UN forces in Korea during August and September 1950. Korean War - Battle of Inchon | 1950 | Fight for Seoul | US Invasion of the Korean Peninsula
Views: 52526 The Best Film Archives
How to Escape a Sinking Submarine | US Navy Training Film | 1953
 
26:04
● Please SUPPORT my work on Patreon: https://bit.ly/2LT6opZ ● Visit my 2ND CHANNEL: https://bit.ly/2ILbyX8 ►Facebook: https://bit.ly/2INA7yt ►Twitter: https://bit.ly/2Lz57nY ►Google+: https://bit.ly/2IPz7dl ✚ Watch my "Military Training Films" PLAYLIST: https://bit.ly/2G6XIrN U.S. Navy training film (1953) instructs submariners on how to escape a submarine in case of emergency. * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * The Naval Submarine Base New London is the United States Navy's primary East Coast submarine base, also known as the "Home of the Submarine Force". It is located in Groton, Connecticut. At the Naval Submarine Base New London thousands of students go through Submarine School, which encompasses the varied curriculum required of a Naval submariner. One element of the school is escape training, where the students are taught, over two days, the steps required for a safe and orderly escape from a submarine in turmoil. How do you escape from a sinking submarine? Most U.S. Navy submarines have two escape routes-called "escape trunks"-that can be used to escape if ever needed. They work like an "air lock" that you may have seen in a movie. The men climb into the escape trunk wearing a special life preserver that has a hood on it to provide a bubble of air to breathe. When the lower hatch is shut, the trunk is filled with water and pressurized to sea pressure. The trunk's outside hatch opens, and the men float to the surface. How are people rescued from a sunken submarine? There are systems built into the submarine to assist the crew to escape safely, if required. The Navy has also developed two rescue submarines called Deep Submersible Rescue Vehicles (DSRV). You may have seen them in the movies, Hunt for Red October, or Gray Lady Down. They drive up to the damaged submarine, mate to the escape hatch and take the crew to safety. New technologies are planned for incorporation into the next generation rescue system called the "Submarine Rescue Diving and Recompression System." How to Escape a Sinking Submarine | US Navy Training Film | 1953 TBFA_0010
Views: 102235 The Best Film Archives
Battle of Tarawa | 1943 | Bloodiest Battle in the Pacific Theater of WW2 | US Army Battle Footage
 
08:18
● Please SUPPORT my work on Patreon: https://bit.ly/2LT6opZ ● Visit my 2ND CHANNEL: https://bit.ly/2ILbyX8 ►Facebook: https://bit.ly/2INA7yt ►Twitter: https://bit.ly/2Lz57nY ►Google+: https://bit.ly/2IPz7dl ✚ Watch my "WW2 in the Pacific" PLAYLIST: https://bit.ly/2KUw6ZY The Battle of Tarawa was a battle in the Pacific Theater of World War II, fought from November 20 to November 23, 1943. Tarawa was the most fortified atoll America would invade during the Pacific Campaign. Previous landings met little or no initial resistance, but this time the 4,500 Japanese defenders were well-prepared, and they fought almost to the last man, exacting a heavy toll on the United States Marine Corps. More than 1,000 U.S. troops were killed in action and some 2,000 were wounded in only three days of fighting at Tarawa. Battle of Tarawa | 1943 | Bloodiest Battle in the Pacific Theater of WW2 | US Army Battle Footage About the the Battle of Tarawa: In the Battle of Tarawa (November 20-23, 1943) during World War 2, the U.S. began its Central Pacific Campaign against Japan by seizing the heavily fortified, Japanese-held island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll in the Gilbert Islands. The 18,000 U.S. Marines sent to tiny Betio were expected to easily secure it; however, problems quickly arose. Low tides prevented some U.S. landing crafts from clearing the coral reefs that ringed the island. Japanese coastal guns pounded the snagged vessels and desperate Marines gave up on freeing the boats and instead waded toward shore–hundreds of yards away– through chest-deep water amidst enemy fire. Despite heavy resistance from the 4,500 Japanese troops dug in on Betio, the Marines finally took the island after a bloody, 76-hour battle in which both sides suffered heavy casualties. U.S. PACIFIC STRATEGY After entering World War II in December 1941 following the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, the U.S. began to halt Japan’s aggressive expansion in the Pacific with important battle victories at Midway Island (June 1942) and Guadalcanal (August 1942-February 1943) in the South Pacific. American commanders next set their sights on an island-hopping campaign across the central Pacific. They intended to take the Marshall Islands followed by the Mariana Islands, then advance on Japan. The Gilbert Islands, a group of 16 atolls near the equator, were viewed by the U.S. as a stepping stone to the Marshalls and became the first target of the Central Pacific Campaign. In November 1943, the U.S. launched an offensive code-named Operation Galvanic, in which the prime target was the tiny island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll in the Gilbert Islands. (As part of Operation Galvanic, the U.S. would also send a smaller force to the Gilberts’ Makin Atoll, some 100 miles north of Tarawa. Compared with the taking of Tarawa, the U.S. faced far less Japanese resistance at Makin and the Americans secured the atoll by November 23, 1943.) In late December 1941, Tarawa, a coral atoll located some 2,500 miles southwest of Hawaii, had been seized by the Japanese, who heavily fortified Betio, Tarawa’s largest island. By November 19, 1943, American warships had arrived near Tarawa. Naval and air bombardments were planned for the next morning with the goal of weakening Japan’s defenses and clearing the way for 18,000 U.S. Marines to seize the island. However, the taking of Tarawa would prove to be more difficult than the Americans had anticipated. HEAVILY FORTIFIED TARAWA Tarawa was the most fortified atoll America would invade during the Pacific Campaign. Japanese Admiral Keiji Shibasaki (1894-1943), confident in his command, reportedly bragged that the U.S. couldn’t take Tarawa with a million men in 100 years. Measuring around two miles long and a half-mile wide, the island of Betio was crisscrossed with defenses: 100 pillboxes (dug-in concrete bunkers), seawalls, an extensive trench system for defensive movements and an airstrip were supported by coastal guns, antiaircraft guns, heavy and light machine guns and light tanks. Betio’s beaches were naturally ringed with shallow reefs, which were covered with barbed wire and mines. The Japanese garrison at Betio was defended by at least 4,500 troops. The U.S. fleet of warships that arrived at the Tarawa Atoll on November 19, 1943, included battleships, aircraft carriers, cruisers, destroyers and a huge supply fleet, all supporting 18,000 Marines. The attack would be a monumental effort of combined arms coordination in a new war tactic, dubbed “Atoll War,” which relied upon heavy pre-invasion bombardment by battleships and carrier planes. AFTERMATH OF TARAWA More than 1,000 U.S. troops were killed in action and some 2,000 were wounded in only three days of fighting at Tarawa. However U.S. commanders learned important lessons from the Battle of Tarawa that would be applied to future atoll wars.
Views: 171313 The Best Film Archives
How to Protect Your Family and Home in a Nuclear Attack | 1950s Educational Film
 
08:38
● Please SUPPORT my work on Patreon: https://bit.ly/2LT6opZ ● Visit my 2ND CHANNEL: https://bit.ly/2ILbyX8 ►Facebook: https://bit.ly/2INA7yt ►Twitter: https://bit.ly/2Lz57nY ►Google+: https://bit.ly/2IPz7dl ✚ Watch my "Atomic Age" PLAYLIST: https://bit.ly/2IQudNe It is a Cold War era educational film produced in the 1950s by America's Federal Civil Defense Administration. The film offers tips on how to protect your family and your home in case of a nuclear attack. In 1949 the Soviet Union tested its first nuclear explosive. After it, every American citizen, from children to the elderly, had to practice to be ready in the event of nuclear war. HISTORICAL BACKGROUND / CONTEXT During the Cold War era (1947-1991), many Americans feared a nuclear strike from the Soviet Union. Preparedness became the watchword. In January 1951 - In an attempt to protect American civilians - President Truman created the Federal Civil Defense Administration, the Homeland Security Department of its day. The educational propaganda agency of the FCDA developed distributed brochures, films, and radio segments. Advertising firms lent their experts to the mission, newspapers offered free placement of FCDA ads, and celebrities from Orson Welles to Ozzie and Harriet signed up to help pitch the cause. Besides the preparation, the forging of national spirit was also an unstated but undeniable aim. TBFA_0067 How to Protect Your Family and Home in a Nuclear Attack | 1950s Educational Film
Views: 42667 The Best Film Archives
New Zealand Prepares for Japanese Invasion | 1941 | Documentary Film on New Zealand in World War 2
 
08:53
● Please SUPPORT my work on Patreon: https://bit.ly/2LT6opZ ● Visit my 2ND CHANNEL: https://bit.ly/2ILbyX8 ►Facebook: https://bit.ly/2INA7yt ►Twitter: https://bit.ly/2Lz57nY ►Google+: https://bit.ly/2IPz7dl ✚ Watch my "WW2 in the Pacific" PLAYLIST: https://bit.ly/2KUw6ZY This documentary shows us New Zealand's war preparations for a projected Japanese Invasion after the Japanese Empire entered the World War II in December 1941. Until then the war had been a largely remote experience for many New Zealanders... New Zealand Prepares for Japanese Invasion | 1941 | Documentary Film on New Zealand in World War 2 NOTE: THE VIDEO DOCUMENTS HISTORICAL EVENTS. SINCE IT WAS PRODUCED DECADES AGO, IT HAS HISTORICAL VALUES AND CAN BE CONSIDERED AS A VALUABLE HISTORICAL DOCUMENT. THE VIDEO HAS BEEN UPLOADED WITH EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES. ITS TOPIC IS REPRESENTED WITHIN HISTORICAL CONTEXT. THE VIDEO DOES NOT CONTAIN SENSITIVE SCENES AT ALL!
Views: 22195 The Best Film Archives
Post-WW2 Anti-Fascist Educational Film | Don't Be a Sucker | 1947
 
17:08
● Please SUPPORT my work on Patreon: https://bit.ly/2LT6opZ ● Visit my 2ND CHANNEL: https://bit.ly/2ILbyX8 ►Facebook: https://bit.ly/2INA7yt ►Twitter: https://bit.ly/2Lz57nY ►Google+: https://bit.ly/2IPz7dl ✚ Watch my "Old America" PLAYLIST: https://bit.ly/2rOHzmy Don't Be a Sucker! is a short educational film produced by the U.S. War Department in 1943 and re-released in 1947. The film depicts the rise of Nazism in Germany and warns Americans against repeating the mistakes of intolerance made in Nazi Germany. It emphasizes that Americans will lose their country if they let themselves be turned into "suckers" by the forces of fanaticism and hatred. The film was made to make the case for the desegregation of the United States armed forces by simply revealing the connection between prejudice and fascism. This film is not propaganda. To the contrary, it teaches how to recognize and reject propaganda, as was used by the Nazis to promote to bigotry and intimidation. It shows how prejudice can be used to divide the population to gain power. Far more significantly, it then shows how such tactics can be defanged by friendly persuasion; that protection of liberty is a unifying and practical way to live peacefully. Plot: A young American Free Mason is taken in by the message of a soap-box orator who asserts that all good jobs in the United States are being taken by the so-called minorities, domestic and foreign. He falls into a conversation with Hungarian professor who witnessed the rise of Nazism in Berlin and who tells him of the pattern of events that brought Hitler to power in Germany and how Germany's anti-democratic groups split the country into helpless minorities, each hating the other. The professor concludes by pointing out that America is composed of many minorities, but all are united as Americans. HISTORICAL BACKGROUND / CONTEXT Nazi Germany is the common English name for the period in German history from 1933 to 1945, when Germany was governed by a dictatorship under the control of Adolf Hitler and the Nazi Party (NSDAP). Under Hitler's rule, Germany was transformed into a fascist state in which the Nazi Party took totalitarian control over nearly all aspects of life. The official name of the state was Deutsches Reich from 1933 to 1943 and Großdeutsches Reich ("Greater German Reich") from 1943 to 1945. The period is also known under the names the Third Reich (German: Drittes Reich) and the National Socialist Period (German: Zeit des Nationalsozialismus, abbreviated as NS-Zeit). The Nazi regime came to an end after the Allied Powers defeated Germany in May 1945, ending World War 2 in Europe. Hitler was appointed Chancellor of Germany by the President of the Weimar Republic Paul von Hindenburg on 30 January 1933. The Nazi Party then began to eliminate all political opposition and consolidate its power. Hindenburg died on 2 August 1934, and Hitler became dictator of Germany by merging the powers and offices of the Chancellery and Presidency. A national referendum held 19 August 1934 confirmed Hitler as sole Führer (leader) of Germany. All power was centralized in Hitler's person, and his word became above all laws. Racism, especially antisemitism, was a central feature of the regime. The Germanic peoples (the Nordic race) were considered by the Nazis to be the purest branch of the Aryan race, and were therefore viewed as the master race. Millions of Jews and other peoples deemed undesirable by the state were murdered in the Holocaust. Opposition to Hitler's rule was ruthlessly suppressed. Members of the liberal, socialist, and communist opposition were killed, imprisoned, or exiled. The Christian churches were also oppressed, with many leaders imprisoned. Education focused on racial biology, population policy, and fitness for military service. Career and educational opportunities for women were curtailed. Propaganda minister Joseph Goebbels made effective use of film, mass rallies, and Hitler's hypnotizing oratory to control public opinion. The government controlled artistic expression, promoting specific art forms and banning or discouraging others. Following the Allied invasion of Normandy (6 June, 1944), Germany was conquered by the Soviet Union from the east and the other Allied powers from the west and capitulated within a year. The victorious Allies initiated a policy of denazification and put many of the surviving Nazi leadership on trial for war crimes at the Nuremberg trials. Post-WW2 Anti-Fascist Educational Film | Don't Be a Sucker | 1947 TBFA_0103 NOTE: THE VIDEO REPRESENTS HISTORICAL EVENTS. SINCE IT WAS PRODUCED DECADES AGO, IT HAS HISTORICAL VALUES AND CAN BE CONSIDERED AS A VALUABLE HISTORICAL DOCUMENT. THE VIDEO HAS BEEN UPLOADED WITH EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES. ITS TOPIC IS REPRESENTED WITHIN HISTORICAL CONTEXT. THE VIDEO DOES NOT CONTAIN SENSITIVE SCENES AT ALL!
Views: 369266 The Best Film Archives
How to Behave Off-Duty: Killjoy Was Here | US Air Force Animated Training Film | 1956
 
12:08
● Please SUPPORT my work on Patreon: https://bit.ly/2LT6opZ ● Visit my 2ND CHANNEL: https://bit.ly/2ILbyX8 ►Facebook: https://bit.ly/2INA7yt ►Twitter: https://bit.ly/2Lz57nY ►Google+: https://bit.ly/2IPz7dl ✚ Watch my "Military Training Films" PLAYLIST: https://bit.ly/2G6XIrN This classic short video – originally titled as "Killjoy Was Here" – is an animated training film produced for the US Air Force in 1956. The cartoon was intended to educate US Air Force personnel about acceptable and unacceptable off-duty behavior and conduct. It also instructs them on their responsibilities to communities surrounding their installations. Plot: Airman Killjoy makes enemies, then Airman Archie tries to make friends, with the locals near USAF bases. The main message of this film still holds true: As an active duty military personnel you are never truly "off duty" (your duty for the day may be over, but that’s different). Always behave as if you walk around with a sign around your neck saying, "I am a member of the US armed forces. I represent my service and my country. I am proud of who I am, and I welcome you to judge me, my unit and my country by my actions." People can look at you and tell you are an American and a soldier, sailor, marine, or airman, and they will judge you, your unit and the United States based on your behavior. You might be one person among thousands on an American base in an American town or the only American someone in a foreign country will ever meet. Either way how you act will shape how they think of your country (and in the case of US citizens their own country and themselves). The voice of Airman Killjoy was performed by American actor Jackson Beck. He is best known as the announcer on radio's The Adventures of Superman and the voice of Bluto in the Famous Studios-era Popeye theatrical shorts. The title of the cartoon refers to the popular "Kilroy was here" graffiti written by American GIs during World War 2. BACKGROUND / CONTEXT Under Article 133, of the United States Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ), "conduct unbecoming an officer and a gentleman" is an offense that subjects a service member to a court martial. An "officer" is understood to include cadets, commissioned officers, and midshipmen of both sexes, hence, the offense is often referred to as conduct unbecoming. Generally, conduct unbecoming is viewed as a catchall offense; as the Manual for Courts-Martial points out, any other offenses listed in the UCMJ could be considered a violation of Article 133 providing the conduct was "unbecoming" of an officer or a gentleman. A gentleman is considered a "man of honor," and with an elevated standard of manners and morals. The aims of Article 133 are to preserve the integrity of the military’s officers and its ranks. In the military, integrity is stressed as one of the most important leadership traits, and officers are expected to adhere to the highest standards of ethics. For a service member to be charged with violating Article 133, his or her conduct must have disgraced the person or officer, or seriously compromised the officer’s character as a respectable officer and a gentleman. Examples of poor conduct, include: - Dishonesty - Indecency - Injustice - Lawlessness - Stealing - Being drunk and disorderly in public - etc… How to Behave Off-Duty: Killjoy Was Here | US Air Force Animated Training Film | 1956 TBFA_0176 NOTE: THE VIDEO REPRESENTS HISTORY. SINCE IT WAS PRODUCED DECADES AGO, IT HAS HISTORICAL VALUES AND CAN BE CONSIDERED AS A VALUABLE HISTORICAL DOCUMENT. THE VIDEO HAS BEEN UPLOADED WITH EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES. ITS TOPIC IS REPRESENTED WITHIN HISTORICAL CONTEXT. THE VIDEO DOES NOT CONTAIN SENSITIVE SCENES AT ALL!
It's Everybody's Business | Cold War Era Propaganda Cartoon on Capitalism & Free Enterprise | 1954
 
20:11
● Please SUPPORT my work on Patreon: https://bit.ly/2LT6opZ ● Visit my 2ND CHANNEL: https://bit.ly/2ILbyX8 ►Facebook: https://bit.ly/2INA7yt ►Twitter: https://bit.ly/2Lz57nY ►Google+: https://bit.ly/2IPz7dl ✚ Watch my "Old America" PLAYLIST: https://bit.ly/2rOHzmy This animated short film is a Cold War-era propaganda product presented by the United States Chamber of Commerce. The main goal of the cartoon is to glorify the capitalism and the free enterprise system. The film does a great job of demonstrating the basic concepts of capitalism. It explains how business and competition works. It says that we pay taxes to have schools, hospitals, roads, fire and police departments, aid to the needy and obviously national defense. It also says that we shouldn't want the government to provide non essential services since they have to be paid for by higher taxes. The film was produced by John Sutherland. The Freedoms Foundation awarded the film its gold honor medal as "the best film developed in the United States during 1954 to further better understanding of the American way of life". HISTORICAL BACKGROUND / CONTEXT After World War 2 nuclear anxiety, anti-Communism and international political realignments fueled the Cold War-era United States and turned the country's media landscape into a battleground from the late 1940s on. In the press, on the radio, and increasingly through the newly emerging medium of television, business and labor struggled for power over the national consciousness. These opposing forces fought to redefine the economic structure of the American nation. To most working people, postwar "normalcy" meant a final farewell to Depression-induced privation, access to consumer goods unavailable during the war years, and a redistribution of the economic pie through the newly powerful labor movement. To business, however, the end of hostilities promised freedom from New Deal liberalism. Corporations sought an end to planning and government influence, to communist, socialist and labor movements, and above all, shrinkage of the public sector, swollen in sixteen years of economic depression and war. Both sides characterized their points of view as patriotic and their opponents as un-American. Business fought for influence through organizations like the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. Their intentions were presented as lofty and neutral: to educate Americans about their economic system and its benefits. Launching a giant propaganda offensive, these organizations pumped out press releases, published books, organized public and private meetings, bought advertising and produced motion pictures. Differences between capitalism and communism: Capitalism and communism are two political theories which can be stated as the complete opposite of one another as their fundamental ideologies contrast each other in the most prominent ways. Capitalism can best be defined as a financial and a social system that recognizes individual property rights, individual consumption and approves of the private ownership of capital. It gave rise to the industrialization and is based on the rights of the individual and allows individuals unlimited opportunities in creating wealth for themselves. Capitalism also encourages the individual to own as much property and goods that they can afford to buy which in turn results in inequality. This inequality then results in each citizen striving to accumulate more wealth in order to stand above the rest and yet, each individual is supposed to respect the rights of other individuals. The citizens of a capitalist society are provided with equal opportunity when competing as sellers or buyers of goods or property, with the government playing no part in it except setting up certain rules and regulations regarding the process. Capitalism is honest competition and letting the marketplace decide who has the better product for better prices and one sees no oppression of the individual here as a result. Communism is based on the belief that individual gain must be scarified in order to achieve collective gain. Thus communism allows the state or the community the ownership of all goods and services with the intention of promoting a common ownership. Communism preaches of a classless, egalitarian society where everybody is treated equally and everybody is given an equal standing. According to communists, capitalism is a system within the rich get richer and the poor get poorer as a result of the rich people yielding power when the poor are forced to live under their reign. It's Everybody's Business | Cold War Era Propaganda Cartoon on Capitalism & Free Enterprise | 1954 The beautiful music for my intro was created by MusicalBasics. Listen to his music here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BC8RKY2qF9o
Views: 81447 The Best Film Archives
U.S. Marines in Battle of Tarawa | 1943 | WW2 Documentary in Color
 
18:25
● Please SUPPORT my work on Patreon: https://bit.ly/2LT6opZ ● Visit my 2ND CHANNEL: https://bit.ly/2ILbyX8 ►Facebook: https://bit.ly/2INA7yt ►Twitter: https://bit.ly/2Lz57nY ►Google+: https://bit.ly/2IPz7dl ✚ Watch my "WW2 in the Pacific" PLAYLIST: https://bit.ly/2KUw6ZY This film (originally titled as ‘With the Marines at Tarawa’) is a 1944 documentary short film created by the U.S. Marine Corps (USMC). The film depicts the harrowing battle between the U.S. Marines and the Japanese for control of the Pacific island of Tarawa (20–23 November 1943). It used authentic footage taken at the Battle of Tarawa by combat cameramen to tell the story of the American servicemen from the time they get the news that they are to participate in the invasion to the final taking of the island and raising of the Stars and Stripes. The film is in full color and uses no actors, making it a valuable historical document. It is a must see for all students of World War 2 history. It is amazing to see the whole event as it happened. The film won the 1945 Academy Award for Best Documentary Short Subject. The Oscar was presented to the U.S. Marine Corps. HISTORICAL BACKGROUND / CONTEXT The Battle of Tarawa was a battle in the Pacific Theater of World War 2 that was fought from November 20 to November 23, 1943. It took place at the Tarawa Atoll in the Gilbert Islands. Nearly 6,400 Japanese, Koreans, and Americans died in the fighting, mostly on and around the small island of Betio, in the extreme southwest of Tarawa Atoll. The Battle of Tarawa was the first American offensive in the critical central Pacific region. It was also the first time in the Pacific War that the United States faced serious Japanese opposition to an amphibious landing. Previous landings had met little or no initial resistance, but on Tarawa the 4,500 Japanese defenders were well-supplied and well-prepared, and they fought almost to the last man, exacting a heavy toll on the United States Marine Corps. The U.S. had suffered similar casualties throughout the duration of other previous campaigns, for example over the six months of the Guadalcanal Campaign, but the losses on Tarawa were incurred within the space of 76 hours. The Gilbert Islands are part of Micronesia. They became a colony of the British Empire in January 1916. They were invaded and occupied by the Empire of Japan in December 1941. The battle was fought almost two years later. American strategy: In order to set up forward air bases capable of supporting operations across the mid-Pacific, to the Philippines, and into Japan, the U.S. planned to take the Mariana Islands. The Marianas were heavily defended. Naval doctrine of the time held that in order for attacks to succeed, land-based aircraft would be required to weaken the defenses and protect the invasion forces. The nearest islands capable of supporting such an effort were the Marshall Islands, northeast of Guadalcanal. Taking the Marshalls would provide the base needed to launch an offensive on the Marianas, but the Marshalls were cut off from direct communications with Hawaii by a Japanese garrison and air base on the small island of Betio, on the western side of Tarawa Atoll in the Gilbert Islands. Thus, to eventually launch an invasion of the Marianas, the battle had to start far to the east, at Tarawa. U.S. Marines in Battle of Tarawa | 1943 | WW2 Documentary in Color TBFA_0094 (DM_0050) NOTE: THE VIDEO DOCUMENTS HISTORICAL EVENTS. SINCE IT WAS PRODUCED DECADES AGO, IT HAS HISTORICAL VALUES AND CAN BE CONSIDERED AS A VALUABLE HISTORICAL DOCUMENT. THE VIDEO HAS BEEN UPLOADED WITH EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES. ITS TOPIC IS REPRESENTED WITHIN HISTORICAL CONTEXT. THE VIDEO DOES NOT CONTAIN SENSITIVE SCENES AT ALL!
Views: 117028 The Best Film Archives

Space trader windows 7
Virtualenvwrapper windows django unchained
Depends windows exe
Microsoft windows compulsive liar
Microsoft online telescope