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Incoterms Definitions CFR, CIF, CPT, CIP - Universal Shipping News
 
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More: http://www.universalcargo.com/Incoterms-Definitions-Part-2-CFR-CIF-CPT-CIP/ Universal Shipping News presents Incoterms Definitions: Group C – Main Carriage Paid. You need to know what incoterms mean? You’re in the right place. In previous videos we covered Incoterm groups E and F. This video defines all of the Incoterms in Group C. That means we’re covering CFR, CIF, CPT, and CIP. Terms from this group have one thing in common, they are all terms used when the seller can arrange to pay all the fees up to delivery at a foreign port. Now, what do these incoterms mean? 1. CFR: Cost and Freight, aka C&F, aka CNF CFR means that the seller covers all the costs of bringing goods from their origin to the port of destination, including carriage costs and clearing the goods for export, but not including the insurance. Even though the seller takes care of the actual loading and transportation of goods up to the port of destination, the buyer pays the insurance (and therefore assumes the risk) from the moment the goods are loaded onto the vessel on. This term is used exclusively for maritime and inland waterway trade. CIF: Cost Insurance and Freight CIF is identical to CFR, except the seller also covers insurance. With a CIF arrangement, the seller (not the buyer) assumes the risk (and therefore is responsible for purchasing insurance) for the goods during transit from origin to the port of destination. CIF also applies solely to maritime and inland waterway trade. However, CIF may not be appropriate where the goods are handed over to the carrier before they are loaded on the vessel – the usual container scenario. CPT: Carriage Paid To, aka DPC CPT indicates that the seller assumes most of the cost of transportation of the goods including export fees, carriage charges, and fees at the port of destination. Seller does not pay for insurance – that is the buyer’s obligation. The moment that the risk of loss or damage is transferred from seller to buyer is when the goods are loaded onto the first carrier vessel, despite the seller paying the carriage charges.[4] CPT can be used for all modes of transportation, including container or roll-on roll-off traffic. CIP: Carriage and Insurance Paid To CIP is much like CPT in that the seller assumes most of the costs of transportation including export fees, carriage charges, and fees at port of destination. For CIP arrangements, however, the seller is responsible for purchasing insurance for the goods during the carriage. While the seller is required to buy insurance for the carriage, the risk of loss or damage is transferred from seller to buyer when the goods are loaded onto the first carrier vessel. CIP can be used for all modes of transport but is most common for intermodal (i.e. container) shipping. That’s it for Incoterms Group C. In the next video we’ll cover Group D. For more about Incoterms and all your international shipping needs, go to UniversalCargo.com. Until next time, stay in ship shape.
Views: 24989 Universal Cargo
Incoterms Definitions - Group E - EXW - Universal Shipping News
 
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More: http://www.universalcargo.com/blog/bid/94573/Incoterms-Definitions-Part-1-EXW-FCA-FAS-FOB (Incoterms Definitions Part 1: EXW, FCA, FAS, FOB) Universal Shipping News presents – Incoterms Definitions: Group E Group E abbreviations start with E and cover departure of goods. Really, it shouldn’t even be called a group because there is only one incoterm in Group E for you to worry about. But it’s a big one: EXW, which stands for Ex Works. EXW: Ex (Latin for out of or from) Works; i.e. goods available from the place of production. Definition: EXW is usually followed by a place name[1], such as EXW Portland and means essentially that the seller will make the goods available to the buyer at a specified place, i.e. the seller’s premises/warehouse/works/factory, and at a specified time. This fulfills the seller’s obligations – leaving the buyer to load the goods onto whatever transportation has been arranged, clear the goods for export, and bear all the risk during transport. Caveat: Alternate arrangements can be made, such as the seller agreeing to load the goods and assume the risks of such loading, etc. Any such deviation must be made explicit in the contract. When getting an initial price quote for goods, you are usually quoted the price for an Ex Works arrangement, that is, the price of the goods not including shipping, loading, insurance or any of the other costs likely to apply. Therefore, Ex Works translates into the arrangement carrying the minimum obligation and risk for the seller and the maximum obligation and risk assumption for the buyer. Ex Works applies exclusively to air, rail, road, and containerized/multimodal transport. In upcoming videos, we’ll cover groups F, C, and D. Until then, stay in ship shape.
Views: 11656 Universal Cargo
Incoterms Definitions FCA, FAS, FOB - Universal Shipping News
 
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Incoterms Definitions Group F: FCA, FAS, FOB More: http://www.universalcargo.com/blog/bid/94573/Incoterms-Definitions-Part-1-EXW-FCA-FAS-FOB Group F - Main carriage not paid by seller. FCA: Free Carrier Definition: FCA is usually followed by the place name of the initial destination of the goods, such as FCA Anchorage. The term is also referred to as “named place delivery”. Under the terms of FCA, it is the seller’s obligation to hand the goods over to the first carrier at the named place once they have been cleared for export. Using FCA Anchorage as the example, the seller would fulfill their obligation once the goods are cleared for export and delivered from the seller’s warehouse to the carrier waiting at the port of Anchorage. At this point the buyer assumes the risks and costs of any further transport executed by the first carrier. FCA is an incremental increase in the cost and obligation to the seller from the EXW arrangement covered in the last video. Because the seller owns the goods right up to delivery, FCA arrangements allow the seller to resell the goods to someone else while the goods are still in transit. Free Carrier applies exclusively to air, rail, road, and containerized/multimodal transport.[5] FAS: Free Alongside Ship Definition: Free Alongside Ship means the seller must transport the goods all the way to the dock, close enough to be reached by the crane of the ship it will be transported in.[6] Also it is the seller’s responsibility to clear the goods for export. FAS is usually followed by a place name, for example FAS San Francisco. The place name indicates the port where the goods are to be delivered on the quay beside the carrier ship. FAS applies exclusively to maritime and inland waterway shipping. However it does not apply to goods packaged in shipping containers. FAS is instead usually used for goods sold as bulk cargo, such as petroleum products or grain. FOB: Free Onboard Vessel Definition: Free Onboard Vessel is sort of a hybrid, where the seller is obligated to bring the goods all the way to the port, clear the goods for export, AND see that they are loaded onto the ship nominated by the buyer. Once the goods clear the railing of the vessel, the buyer assumes the risk. Again, FOB is often followed by the named loading port thus: FOB Long Beach, meaning the seller delivers the goods, pays the port fees, and sees the goods loaded onto the ship docked at the port of Long Beach. This Incoterm is used exclusively for maritime and inland waterway transport but not for container shipping.
Views: 22426 Universal Cargo
Incoterms Definitions DAT, DAP, DDP - Universal Shipping News
 
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More: http://www.universalcargo.com/incoterms-definitions-part-3-dat-dap-ddp/ Incoterms Definitions - Group D - DAT, DAP, DDP Transcript: Universal Shipping News presents Incoterms Definitions: Group D. I’m Jared Vineyard. In previous videos, we defined the Incoterms in Groups E, F, and C. This video covers DAT, DAP, and DDP. Group D Incoterms apply to any mode of transport. DAT – Delivered at Terminal Definition: This term means that the seller covers all the costs of transport (export fees, carriage, insurance, and destination port charges) and assumes all risk until after the goods are unloaded at the terminal.[3] The buyer covers the cost of transporting the goods from the terminal or port to final destination and pays the import duty/taxes/customs costs. Note: With this arrangement, the seller assumes a large portion of the risks and costs of transport. DAP - Delivered at Place Definition: This term means that the seller pays all the costs of transportation (export fees, carriage, insurance, and destination port charges) up to and including the delivery of the goods to the final destination. The buyer is responsible to pay only the import duty/taxes/customs costs. The buyer also is responsible to unload the goods from the vehicle at the final destination.[5] Note: The big difference between DAP and DAT is that with DAP the seller is responsible for the final leg of the journey and the buyer is responsible for the final unloading of the goods. DDP – Delivered Duty Paid Definition: With DDP the seller again assumes all the risks and costs of transport (export fees, carriage, insurance, and destination port charges, delivery to the final destination), but here the seller also pays any import customs/duty.[6] The buyer has only to unload the goods at the final destination.[7] Note: AKA the non-Incoterm "Free In Store” (FIS), DDP represents maximum responsibility for both costs and risk assumption from beginning to end to the seller. This arrangement is the opposite end of the spectrum from ExWorks (EXW) where the majority of the cost and risk assumption is on the shoulders of the buyer.[8] For more on these incoterms and all the rest, go to UniversalCargo.com. This concludes our video series defining Incoterms.
Views: 24389 Universal Cargo
Universal Cargo - Freightin' Awesome
 
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Universal Cargo imports your goods, handles fulfillment logistics, and delivers right to your customers' door with freightin' awesome customer service. Check us out at: http://www.UniversalCargo.com Some sound effects from http://www.freesfx.co.uk
Views: 28034 Universal Cargo
Cosco Buying OOCL - Universal Shipping News
 
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READ MORE: http://www.universalcargo.com/shrinking-carrier-competition-cosco-buying-oocl/ TRANSCRIPT: Hello and welcome to Universal Shipping News, where we ask, “What the freight is going on with international shipping?” I’m Jared Vineyard The big news out of international shipping this week is the continued shrinking of carrier competition with the announcement that Cosco Shipping will be buying Orient Overseas Container Line, or OOCL. Now, Cosco is not buying OOCL by itself. Shanghai International Port Group is partnering with Cosco in this $6.3 billion carrier buyout, but when all is said and done, Cosco will own just over 90% of OOCL’s parent company, OOIL, while Shanghai International Port Group will own just under 10%. Now, many shippers may not notice the shrinking of carrier competition right away as Cosco has pledged maintain OOCL’s listed status. But make no mistake, this drops one more major carrier out of the competition pool and firmly moves Cosco into position number three of the world’s largest ocean carriers by capacity. Remember our once pristine Carrier Craziness Bracket? Here’s what it looks like now with this latest competition shrinking event taken into account. I mean, that’s just gobbledy-gook with lines, and circles, and carriers crossed out… Maybe in the end this really is like March Madness or the Highlander, and there can be only one. If so, the safe money’s on Maersk, but Cosco Shipping will certainly make things interesting. For more details on this story, and all your international shipping needs, check out the blog at UniversalCargo.com. Please like this video, share, subscribe, and… Until next time, stay in shipshape!
Views: 855 Universal Cargo
Part 2 - Managing Your Human Resources - 4 Signs Your Employee May Becoming A Problem - Devin's 7's
 
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http://www.UniversalCargo.com Devin's 7's 7 HR Tips to Managing Your Human Resources Part 2 - 4 Signs Your Employee May Becoming A Problem In the second part of this seven part series, Scott Jette, CEO at Credo Consulting, leads a panel in a discussion to help spot the signs that your employee employee could be becoming a real problem. Scott sits along with Devin Burke, CEO at UCM, and Kamy Eliassi, Managing Director at UCM, and discusses unresponsiveness, changes in routine, bad vibes, and employees inability to admit error. We hope you enjoy this series of Devin's 7's. We aim to educate as well as entertain. Feel free to subscribe or interact with us all over the internet via our website, blog, or social media accounts.
Views: 1626 Universal Cargo
Air Freight Vs. Ocean Freight - Universal Shipping News
 
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Air Freight Vs. Ocean Freight More: http://www.universalcargo.com/blog/air-freight-vs.-ocean-shipping-7-round-fight-which-will-win-your-cargo Air Shipping and Ocean shipping face off in 8 categories: Speed, Reliability, Cost, Capacity, Destinations, Tracking, Logistical Complications, and Environmental Impact This will help you decide which type of international shipping you should use for your cargo movement. Winner of Speed, Reliability, and Destinations: Air Freight Winner of Cost, Capacity, and Environmental Impact: Ocean Freight Tracking and Logistical Complications: Tie
Views: 8359 Universal Cargo
ILA, USMX Agree to New Dockworkers Contract - Universal Shipping News
 
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The International Longshoremen's Association and United States Maritime Alliance get past contentious automation issue to reach a tentative 6-year Master Contract agreement.
Views: 338 Universal Cargo
The Deal With Incoterms - Universal Shipping News
 
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Incoterms Blog Series: http://www.universalcargo.com/blog/bid/94488/What-s-the-Deal-With-Incoterms Definitions Part 1: http://www.universalcargo.com/blog/bid/94573/Incoterms-Definitions-Part-1-EXW-FCA-FAS-FOB Definitions Part 2: http://www.universalcargo.com/blog/bid/94644/Incoterms-Definitions-Part-2-CFR-CIF-CPT-CIP Definitions Part 3: http://www.universalcargo.com/blog/bid/94731/Incoterms-Definitions-Part-3-DAT-DAP-DDP Video Transcript: Universal Shipping News presents: What’s the Deal With Incoterms. I’m Jared Vineyard. Let’s face it, if you’re conducting international business or planning on doing so, you need a firm grasp on incoterms. That’s why we’re doing this video series to go through the different Incoterms and what they mean. The government says the purpose of Incoterms is “to alleviate or reduce confusion over interpretations of shipping terms, by outlining exactly who is obligated to take control of and/or insure goods at a particular point in the shipping process.” Basically, an international business deal involving the shipping of goods is labeled by an Incoterm, and that incoterm defines who pays for what in the shipping process. There are 4 groups of Incoterms, each represented by a letter that appears at the beginning of Incoterms in the group. The four groups are: ▪ Group E – Departure ▪ Group F -- Main Carriage Unpaid ▪ Group C -- Main Carriage Paid ▪ And Group D – Arrival In the upcoming weeks, we’ll post videos defining exactly what the various Incoterms in each group mean. In the meantime, you can check out our blog where we’ve laid out each incoterm with an explanation of it. You can always suggest topics for us to cover in our blogs and videos with the hashtag #WhatTheFreight. Until next time, stay in ship shape.
Views: 822 Universal Cargo
Maersk Splitting & 2M Shunning Hyundai - Universal Shipping News
 
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READ MORE: Maersk Splitting - http://www.universalcargo.com/divide-conquer-maersk-splits-to-go-after-competition/ READ MORE: HMM not joining 2M - http://www.universalcargo.com/future-of-carrier-alliances-changes-with-hanjin-collapse/ TRANSCRIPT: Hello and welcome to Universal Shipping News, where we ask, “What the freight is going on with international shipping?” I’m Jared Vineyard Maersk, the biggest shipping line in international shipping by capacity is splitting into two divisions, one to focus on logistics, the shipping line and the other oil… energy. Aw, ship it all to Hell, MI! I really liked that pencil. With this division able to concentrate solely on international shipping, Maersk is going to stop ordering new ships and focus on the acquisition of smaller carriers that have struggled with profitability in recent years. In other words, Maersk is going to be like a predator in the waters, eating up the competition. (Sings Jaws theme.) Jaws. Speaking of Maersk and weaker carriers, after the collapse of Hanjin, it looks like Maersk and Mediterranean Shipping Company (MSC) are no longer planning to let Hyundai Merchant Marine into their 2M carrier alliance. It seemed like the two biggest carriers in the world were going to let Hyundai into their club in order to increase their presence and influence in the Asian region and shipping routes. But when Hanjin went into receivership, 2M aggressively moved in with capacity to gain Hanjin’s former customers. I guess Hyundai is no longer needed. But hey, maybe Maersk could try to acquire the company. For more on these stories, check out the blog at UniversalCargo.com. Help us out by liking this video and subscribing. Until next time, stay in shipshape!
Views: 318 Universal Cargo
Unprecedented Low Freight Rates in 2018 - Universal Shipping News
 
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READ MORE: : http://www.universalcargo.com/freight-rates-to-hit-record-lows-again-in-2018/ TRANSCRIPT: Hello and welcome to Universal Shipping News, where we ask, “What the freight is going on with international shipping?” I’m Jared Vineyard Let’s talk freight rates. 2018 is shaping up to be a good year for shippers in terms of freight rates. Alphaliner projects freight rates to hit unprecedented lows in 2018 if carriers are unable to be disciplined with capacity. Carriers have struggled to control capacity. In fact, overcapacity has plagued the international shipping industry for a decade, creating downward pressure on freight rates and financial struggles for carriers. Freight rates hit record lows in 2016, but carriers actually made headway in increasing freight rates for much of 2017. But despite peak season increases in shipping, capacity still outpaced demand and freight rates slipped. 2018 could see those freight rates continue to fall even lower than anything we say in 2016. While that’s good for shippers’ bottom lines in the short term, the continued shrinking of carrier competition it would likely create could be bad for shippers in the long run. For more details on this story, and all your international shipping needs, go to UniversalCargo.com. If you liked this video, please give it that thumbs up like, comment, share, subscribe, and… Until next time, stay in shipshape!
Views: 384 Universal Cargo
Carrier Alliances Bring Real March Madness for Shippers - Universal Shipping News
 
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READ MORE: http://www.universalcargo.com/carrier-alliances-bring-real-march-madness-for-shippers/ Transcript: Hello and welcome to Universal Shipping News, where we ask, “What the freight is going on with international shipping?” I’m Jared Vineyard. Shippers all over the world are worried about a busted bracket, but not their March Madness bracket. No, it’s the busted Carrier Craziness Bracket that has shippers worried. Like March Madness brackets mark the shrinking competition pool in NCAA basketball, Universal Cargo’s Carrier Craziness Bracket marks the shrinking competition pool of ocean carriers in the international shipping industry. I made the initial Carrier Craziness Bracket in 2014 when the ill-fated P3 Network was making headlines and carrier alliances were becoming the new trend in international shipping. Who knew that bracket would be busted worse than one of Universal Cargo CEO Devin Burke’s March Madness brackets. The Carrier Craziness Bracket has been updated and updated to mark carrier competition shrinking and alliances reshuffling until we got to just three alliances that will dominate the world’s ocean shipping starting April 1st. Ocean shipping being dominated by these three carrier alliances, the 2M, THE Alliance, and Ocean Alliance has shippers worried about reductions in shipping options, possible cargo disruptions during the alliance reshuffle, and of course freight rate increases through shrinking competition and possible collusion. For more details on this story, and all your international shipping needs, check out the blog at UniversalCargo.com. Please like this video, share, subscribe, and… Until next time, stay in shipshape!
Views: 283 Universal Cargo
Maersk Buying Hamburg Süd - Universal Shipping News
 
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MORE: http://www.universalcargo.com/maersk-acquiring-hamburg-sud/ TRANSCRIPT: Hello and welcome to Universal Shipping News, where we ask, “What the freight is going on with international shipping?” I’m Jared Vineyard Carrier competition in the international shipping industry is shrinking faster than America’s trust in presidential election polls. Maersk, already the world’s largest carrier by capacity, just announced that it will be buying out Hamburg Süd, the world’s seventh largest carrier. This acquisition is estimated to be between a 3 and 5 billion dollar cash deal. This is the first big move from Maersk since announcing its new strategy to acquire competing ocean carriers. Looks like the company wasn’t bluffing. Shippers have enjoyed low freight rates for the last several years as carriers have struggled with overcapacity and billion dollar losses. Now we’re finally seeing the inevitable result with mergers, buyouts, Hanjin’s collapse… With fewer and fewer carriers controlling ocean shipping, the day is not far off when shippers will be the ones looking at freight rates instead of carriers and saying, “What the freight?!” For more details on this story, and all your international shipping needs, check out the blog at UniversalCargo.com. Please like this video, share, subscribe, and… Until next time, stay in shipshape!
Views: 944 Universal Cargo
Part 1 - Managing Your Human Resources - 4 Signs Your Company May Be Dysfunctional - Devin's 7's
 
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http://www.UniversalCargo.com Devin's 7's 7 HR Tips to Managing Your Human Resources Part 1 - 4 Signs Your Company May Be Dysfunctional In the first part of this seven part series, Kamy Eliassi, Managing Director at UCM, leads a panel in a discussion to help spot the signs that your company may be going dysfunctional. Kamy sits along with Devin Burke, CEO at UCM, and Scott Jette, CEO at Credo Consulting, and discusses low employee morale, high employee turnover, employees resenting the customers, and leaders stifling the initiative of the workers. We hope you enjoy this series of Devin's 7's. We aim to educate as well as entertain. Feel free to subscribe or interact with us all over the internet via our website, blog, or social media accounts.
Views: 881 Universal Cargo
Automated Freight Forwarders - Universal Shipping News
 
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Read More: http://www.universalcargo.com/are-automated-freight-forwarders-better-for-shippers/ Transcript: Hello and welcome to Universal Shipping News, where we ask, “What the freight is going on with international shipping?” I’m Jared Vineyard Freight forwarders are coming under fire lately over automation. Or the lack thereof. Technology has put anything a consumer wants at his or her fingertips or thumbtip. Want to know how much the complete works of Stanley Kubrick cost? Looks like you only get 10 of his 13 films, but its $112.64. That’s not in the budget, so I’ll just buy a pair of Air Jordans now. For $190 Done. Who in this day and age doesn’t give you this instant satisfaction? Freight forwarders. You mean I can’t instantly see how much it costs to import or export cargo in the extremely volatile international shipping industry and book my freight movement on the spot? With online marketplace heavyweights Amazon and Alibaba pushing into international shipping and the tech industry knocking on the door of the logistics industry, the word is that freight forwarders need to introduce instant online freight rate platforms or become obsolete. The complexity of the international shipping industry does not lend itself well to instant freight rate quotes. And is that what shippers really need anyway? No. The need is for someone with expertise to make sure all those Jordans get imported smoothly, without delays and unnecessary costs and fees, so I can buy them instantly at a reasonable price. That’s what a freight forwarder does. They get me my shoes. I can probably stream Kubrick instantly online. Hey, there is a demand for that immediacy of freight rate automation, and it’s inevitable that freight forwarders will need to meet that demand. Already companies are popping up with the purpose of providing this service. But without the industry experience and relationships of traditional freight forwarders, who can handle all the intricacies of international shipping, the convenience of freight rate automation could quickly be outweighed by shipping complications. Shippers, how important is automation in the freight rate gathering process to you? Or is a relationship with a real live person and international shipping expert more important for your importing and exporting needs. I imagine the two must eventually be married. Let us know your thoughts in the comments section. For more on this topic, and all your international shipping needs, check out UniversalCargo.com. Please like this video, share, subscribe, and… Until next time, stay in shipshape!
Views: 359 Universal Cargo
Hurricanes Harvey & Irma Shipping Effects - Universal Shipping News
 
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Donate to Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund - http://bit.ly/2gRQMUS More on Hurricane Harvey Story - http://www.universalcargo.com/hurricane-harvey-update-gulf-coast-shipping-resumed/ http://www.universalcargo.com/hurricane-harvey-hurts-people-supply-chain/ More on Hurricane Irma Story - http://www.universalcargo.com/u-s-ports-bracing-for-another-deadly-hurricane/ Live Hurricane Irma Updates - http://www.cnn.com/2017/09/09/us/hurricane-irma-cuba-florida/index.html Transcript - Hello and welcome to Universal Shipping News, where we ask, “What the freight is going on with international shipping?” I’m Jared Vineyard What’s going on with shipping? Hurricanes. Plural. Two hurricanes. First, Hurricane Harvey put Houston underwater, destroyed homes, took lives… and when it comes to shipping and the supply chain, the hurricane halted trucking and rail in the region, shut down Houston airports as well as Gulf Coast ports, the Port of Houston, the Port of Corpus Christi, the Port of Galveston… Universal Cargo Atlanta Operations Manager Erick Constantino pointed out the chain reaction that happens in shipping from events like this. “When operations are shut down in one area, it has a ripple effect across the nation. For imports, we will see delays on ETAs as vessels are parked at sea until operations resume. That’ll lead to delays at the other ports the vessel is calling. For exports, that will mean the containers will have delayed departures and a shortage of available equipment. For truckers, they’ll have to assess the damage to their equipment, and we can expect port congestions when operations resume as every container will be hot for delivery.” What’s crazy is we haven’t even seen the full supply chain fallout from Hurricane Harvey and now Hurricane Irma, a category 5 hurricane, is headed straight for Florida. Ports in Florida are, of course, shutting down, stacking rippling shipping disruption upon rippling shipping disruption. Irma has been downgraded to a category 4 hurricane, but is still extremely dangerous and is expected to make landfall in Florida sometime between early tomorrow (Sunday, September 10th) and early Monday, September 11th. I’ll put links below to more on these stories at UniversalCargo.com, but also to a Hurricane Harvey relief fund you can give to in order to support those who are still in desperate need of aid in Houston. If you liked this video, please give it that thumbs up like, share, subscribe, and… Until next time, stay in shipshape!
Views: 165 Universal Cargo
Top 10 Stories of 2016 - Universal Shipping News
 
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MORE: http://www.universalcargo.com/top-10-international-shipping-stories-of-2016/ TRANSCRIPT: Welcome to Universal Shipping News. I'm Jared Vineyard. 2016 is over, but some of the things that happened will have a lasting effect. Let's look back on the year by counting down the top 10 international shipping news stories of the year. #10 – RECORD LOW FREIGHT RATES Bad news for carriers, but great news for shippers. Or was it? #9 – CHINA LIFTING BAN ON U.S. BEEF IMPORTS China no longer having a beef with U.S. beef is huge news for agricultural exporters. #8 – MOL, NYK, AND K LINE PLAN MERGER This is something like Japan’s shipping industry’s version of the Holy Trinity. #7 – EL FARO’S BLACK BOX FOUND The finding of the El Faro’s black box is a chance at unraveling just what happened in the greatest international shipping tragedy involving a U.S. ship in decades. #6 – NEW VERIFIED GROSS MASS RULE Panic and controversy spread as the new VGM rule was about to go into effect. But was it mainly much ado about nothing? #5 – CHINA COSCO SHIPPING FORMED China’s two big shipping companies merged to form a shipping leviathan that would shake up carrier alliances. #4 – PANAMA CANAL EXPANSION COMPLETED Finally. Finally, finally, finally, the Panama Canal expansion was completed 2016. #3 – 3 CARRIER ALLIANCES TO RULE SHIPPING Carriers have organized into three big alliances set to rule international shipping. #2 – MAERSK GOES AFTER COMPETITION Maersk split into two divisions with the shipping division looking to acquire competing shipping companies. #1 – HANJIN BANKRUPTCY Could there possibly be a bigger international shipping story in 2016 than a major carrier suddenly, and not so suddenly really, going bankrupt? That’s the list. Read about all these stories on UniversalCargo.com. What do you think? Did we miss any, get the order wrong? Let us know in the comments. Subscribe and share while you’re at it. And as always, stay in ship shape.
Views: 618 Universal Cargo
Part 4 a - Managing Your Human Resources - Hiring & Firing - Devin's 7's
 
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http://www.UniversalCargo.com Devin's 7's 7 HR Tips to Managing Your Human Resources Part 4 a - Hiring & Firing In the fourth part of this seven part series, Kamy Eliassi, Managing Director at UCM, leads a panel in a discussion to help with hiring and firing. Kamy sits along with Devin Burke, CEO at UCM, and Scott Jette, CEO at Credo Consulting, and discusses about not rushing into hiring, screening resumes, and making the first day a strong day. We hope you enjoy this series of Devin's 7's. We aim to educate as well as entertain. Feel free to subscribe or interact with us all over the internet via our website, blog, or social media accounts.
Views: 527 Universal Cargo
Universal Shipping News - Hanjin Collapses
 
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MORE: http://www.universalcargo.com/hanjin-collapses-how-badly-will-it-hurt-u-s-shippers/ http://www.universalcargo.com/hanjin-collapses-and-you-wont-believe-what-happened-next/ Transcript: Hello and welcome to Universal Shipping News where we ask, “What the freight is going on in International Shipping.” I’m Jared Vineyard. Dominating international shipping news is the collapse of South Korea’s largest shipping company, Hanjin Shipping. Hanjin filed for court receivership. Hanjin is the world’s 7th largest container carrier by capacity, making this the biggest international shipping industry bankruptcy ever! The question isn’t “How the freight did this happen?” The major shipping lines around the world have been bleeding money for the better part of a decade (and I’m talking carriers enduring losses in the billions of dollars in single years). So the question is, “how the freight did it take this long for one of the big carriers to go down? Hanjin’s collapse couldn’t have happened at a worse time for shippers. It’s peak season, when international shipping is at its busiest in preparation for the holidays. Hanjin ships are not being allowed to bring their cargo to ports. Capacity shrank. Freight rates are jumping. Risk of congestion is increasing. And a whole lot of shippers out there are scrambling to get cargo moved. Many shippers who are not actually Hanjin customers are finding their cargo is held up on Hanjin ships because of the vessel sharing agreement or carrier alliance Hanjin was a part of. These shippers have to be looking at the shipping companies they paid to transport their cargo and saying, “You’ve got to be shipping me!” For more on this story, check out the blog on UniversalCargo.com. Don’t forget to like this video and subscribe. Until next time, stay in ship shape.
Views: 508 Universal Cargo
Part 3 - Managing Your Human Resources - How Your Employees Are Predictably Different - Devin's 7's
 
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http://www.UniversalCargo.com Devin's 7's 7 HR Tips to Managing Your Human Resources Part 3 - How Your Employees Are Predictably Different In the first part of this seven part series, Scott Jette, CEO at Credo Consulting, leads a panel in a discussion about how people in your company are different but they are predictably different. Scott sits along with Devin Burke, CEO at UCM, and Kamy Eliassi, Managing Director at UCM, and discusses the D.I.S.C. Personality types. There are four types of personalities, D = Dominant, I = Influencer , S = Stable, C = Correct. We hope you enjoy this series of Devin's 7's. We aim to educate as well as entertain. Feel free to subscribe or interact with us all over the internet via our website, blog, or social media accounts.
Views: 890 Universal Cargo
What Maersk Says About Ocean Freight Carrier Competition - Universal Shipping News
 
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READ MORE: http://www.universalcargo.com/maersk-expects-carrier-competition-to-shrink-to-3-global-companies/ TRANSCRIPT: Hello and welcome to Universal Shipping News, where we ask, “What the freight is going on with international shipping?” I’m Jared Vineyard What the freight’s going on with international shipping? Shrinking carrier competition. We’ve been seeing it the last few years with carrier alliances, mergers, buyouts, bankruptcy… The competition pool in ocean shipping is getting smaller and smaller. But according to Maersk, the world’s largest carrier by capacity and the undeniable leader when it comes to international shipping, you ain’t seen nothing yet. While he couldn’t put a timeframe on it, Maersk’s COO Soren Toft said they expect, and I quote, “that you will see maybe a handful of shipping companies, a little bit similar to what you see in the courier express and parcel industry, where there’re really, you know, three global companies.” Maersk let it be known a little over a year ago that its new strategy is to acquire competing carriers in order to grow without ordering and adding new ships to an industry already plagued by overcapacity. If Maersk is right in its expectation, this will mean many major international shipping lines getting acquired, merging, or going bankrupt. And it’s hard to imagine shippers enjoying freight rates nearly as low as they’ve seen in recent years if there are only three companies controlling ocean freight shipping. For more details on this story, and all your international shipping needs, go to UniversalCargo.com If you liked this video, please give it that thumbs up like, share, subscribe, and… Until next time, stay in shipshape!
Views: 139 Universal Cargo
What Trump Presidency Means for Shippers - Universal Shipping News
 
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READ MORE: http://www.universalcargo.com/what-does-trump-presidency-mean-for-shippers/ TRANSCRIPT: Hello and welcome to Universal Shipping News, where we ask, “What the freight is going on with international shipping?” I’m Jared Vineyard The real question today is, “What the freight will Donald Trump’s presidency mean for shippers?” President-elect Trump’s impact on the international shipping industry, and U.S. importers in particular, has the potential to be HUGE. On the campaign trail, Trump said international trade and outsourcing is destroying American manufacturing and that China is killing the U.S. in this area. The President-elect spoke of a policy when he’s president to turn around the United State’s trade deficit utilizing tariffs on imports and renegotiating or pulling out of trade deals. What the international shipping industry fears President-elect Trump’s platform adds up to is Protectionism—a policy where international trade is restricted or restrained to protect local businesses and jobs. Those fears were made evident by the stock of the world’s largest ocean carrier by capacity, AP Moller-Maersk, falling immediately upon Trump’s election. U.S. shippers, especially those that import from China, worry about the president-elect’s statements hiking tariffs by as much as 40 or 45%. Such tariffs would certainly increase costs for importers and possible disrupt trade deals, especially since there is already tension between China and the U.S. over the conflict in the South China Sea. But Billionaire investor and Trump advisor Wilbur Ross is trying to allay those fears, saying the president-elect does not plan to just drop a unilateral 40-45% tariff increase on imports from China. Instead, threatening China with a 45% tariff is a potential tactic for negotiating the trade imbalance between China and the U.S. in the face of China’s currency manipulation undervaluing the yuan by as much 45%. It’s impossible to know exactly what President-elect Trump’s policies will look like once he’s in office. And it’s important to remember that no president has ever implemented all the things he promised on the campaign trail, not Obama, not Bush, Not Clinton, not Bush—the other Bush, the first Bush, you know what I’m saying. Take a breath, shippers. President-elect Trump comes from the business world; he’s not going to put an end to international trade. International business and shipping will go on. For more details on this story, and all your international shipping needs, check out the blog at UniversalCargo.com. Please like, subscribe, and… Until next time, stay in shipshape!
Views: 179 Universal Cargo
Maersk Fire & ILA Contract - Universal Shipping News
 
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READ MORE ABOUT MAERSK MEGASHIP FIRE: http://www.universalcargo.com/tragic-fire-on-maersk-megaship-shows-need-for-container-contents-verification-in-shipping/ READ MORE ABOUT ILA, USMX CONTRACT NEGOTIATIONS: http://www.universalcargo.com/ila-usmx-to-reopen-negotiations/
Views: 364 Universal Cargo
South China Sea Tension Intensifies - Universal Shipping News
 
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Read More: http://www.universalcargo.com/south-china-sea-tensions-intensify-under-trump/ The South China Sea: That’s always the freight going on with international shipping. Approximately $5 trillion of cargo ships through its shipping lanes every year. But there’s conflict there. China claims almost all of the South China Sea as its sovereign territory. But Vietnam, the Philippines, Brunei, Malaysia, and Taiwan all have conflicting claims. To strengthen its claims China has literally built man-made islands in the South China Sea, which apparently is a thing you can do. The problem is it didn’t sit well with China’s neighbors that have conflicting claims. Did I mention China militarized these islands? Yeah, this didn’t sit well with the United States either. Tensions grew as the U.S. refused to recognize these islands under the Obama administration, which did things like passing a warship right next to the islands to make clear the U.S. stance that these are international waters, not China’s territory. That tension intensified with Donald Trump moving into the Oval Office. President Trump’s Secretary of State nominee, Rex Tillerson said the U.S. would stop China from building more of these islands and deny China’s access to the ones they’ve already built. China’s state-run newspaper said Washington would have to wage a large scale war in the South China Sea to prevent Chinese access to these islands.
Views: 251 Universal Cargo
ILA Meeting on Early Contract Extension - Universal Shipping News
 
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READ MORE: http://www.universalcargo.com/early-contract-extension-may-happen-with-dockworkers-at-east-gulf-coast-ports/ TRANSCRIPT: Hello and welcome to Universal Shipping News, where we ask, “What the freight is going on with international shipping?” I’m Jared Vineyard This one is a big deal for U.S. importers and exporters. There are plans for the International Longshoremen’s Association, or ILA, to meet with their East and Gulf Coast port employers next month to talk about a contract extension. The current ILA contract is set to expire at the end of September next year. Normally, dockworker unions do not extend or agree to new contracts before the previous contract expires so they can utilize the threat of strikes, strikes, and labor slowdowns as leverage in negotiations. Of course, shippers are hoping to see an early contract extension agreement at the ports to avoid contentious negotiations, slowdowns, shutdowns, delays, and congestion at the ports that seem to be the costly norm when contracts with the dockworkers unions expire. In August, the International Longshore and Warehouse Union, or ILWU, actually agreed to extend its contract with the Pacific Maritime Association, or PMA, all the way through July of 2022. According to the Journal of Commerce, the ILA extension being discussed would go even longer, all the way to September 2024. For more details on this story, and all your international shipping needs, go to UniversalCargo.com. If you liked this video, please give it that thumbs up like, share, subscribe, and… Until next time, stay in shipshape!
Views: 66 Universal Cargo
Part 4 b - Managing Your Human Resources - Hiring & Firing - Devin's 7's
 
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http://www.UniversalCargo.com Devin's 7's 7 HR Tips to Managing Your Human Resources Part 4 b - Hiring & Firing In the fourth part of this seven part series, Kamy Eliassi, Managing Director at UCM, leads a panel in a discussion to help with hiring and firing. Kamy sits along with Devin Burke, CEO at UCM, and Scott Jette, CEO at Credo Consulting, and discusses giving opportunities to improve, documenting your reasons, firing first thing in the morning, showing respect and honor, and never burning bridges. We hope you enjoy this series of Devin's 7's. We aim to educate as well as entertain. Feel free to subscribe or interact with us all over the internet via our website, blog, or social media accounts.
Views: 436 Universal Cargo
Universal Shipping News Episode #1
 
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What the freight is going on with international shipping? Arctic shipping. You better find a new home, Santa, because cargo ships are planning to sale right through the North Pole. Thanks to a little thing we like to call global warming, ice is reducing in the Arctic Ocean, creating shorter shipping lanes with the potential to have huge impacts on international shipping. Russia and China are working to be big players in Arctic shipping. Russia is using their geographical advantage to claim control of the entire "Northern Sea Route" portion of the Northeast Passage and China has cut through ice to send commercial ships through the Arctic. Now Germany and Iceland have stepped up efforts to be big players in Arctic shipping, perhaps opening a door for the U.S. to enter the game. Germany and Iceland are working together on a port to be a hub for Arctic shipping through the Transpolar Sea Route, a future Arctic shipping lane running from the Atlantic Ocean to the Pacific Ocean across the center of the Arctic Ocean. At the other end, could be a hub in Alaska. And don’t worry about Santa, with global warming, the ice wasn’t going to be able to hold his workshop much longer anyway. Speaking of global warming, the ocean freight shipping industry had made serious strides in reducing greenhouse gas CO2 emissions over the last several years. But there is a hard green push to do more. The International Transport Federation proposed a CO2 tax on the maritime industry that could cost ship owners $400,000 per ship per year. Spreading that across the global fleet, 50,000 ships, the tax would cost carriers an additional $20 billion a year. Put this together with Members of the European Parliament pushing for the International Maritime Association to develop a global emissions reduction framework by the end of 2016, and serious pressure can be seen on the ocean freight industry. The European Community Shipowners' Association (ECSA) says that the 2016 deadline on emissions reduction framework is "unrealistic" and could be counterproductive to the efforts of the industry that has actually reduced emissions despite increased shipping demand and is significantly the lowest mode of transport in terms of CO2 emissions. Want more on these stories? Click the links provided. If you have questions pertaining to international shipping, ask us on Facebook or Twitter with the hash tag: #WhatTheFreight Until next time, stay in shipshape!
Views: 1275 Universal Cargo
China Crackdown Shuts Down Tens of Thousands of Factories - Universal Shipping News
 
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READ MORE: http://www.universalcargo.com/china-pollution-crackdown-shuts-down-thousands-of-factories-disrupting-supply-chain/ TRANSCRIPT: Hello and welcome to Universal Shipping News, where we ask, “What the freight is going on with international shipping?” I’m Jared Vineyard Tens of thousands of factories shut down in China, disrupting the supply chain at the source for many U.S. importers. And this during peak shipping season as holiday shopping is right around the corner. What the freight happened? China is cracking down on pollution. Over five and half thousand inspectors from China’s environment ministry and the Communist Party’s anti-graft watchdog and personnel unit were dispatched to make sure the environment is being properly protected throughout China’s provinces. Local officials freaked out, shutting down all possible pollution sources. That’s how tens of thousands of factories suddenly shut their doors. While this is sudden, unexpected bad news for many U.S. shippers importing from China, it is literally a breath of fresh air for the more than 1.4 billion people who live in China. If you ever visit the country, you may see people walking with surgical masks over their faces to protect themselves from pollution that you also can literally see in the air in parts of the country. For more details on this story, and all your international shipping needs, go to UniversalCargo.com. If you liked this video, please give it that thumbs up like, share, subscribe, and… Until next time, stay in shipshape!
Views: 267 Universal Cargo
FMC Approves OCEAN Alliance, Hanjin's European Shutdown - Universal Shipping News
 
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MORE ON OCEAN ALLIANCE APPROVED BY FMC: http://www.universalcargo.com/ocean-alliance-approved-by-fmc/ MORE ON HANJIN CLOSING EUROPEAN OPERATIONS: http://www.universalcargo.com/hanjin-closing-european-operations/ TRANSCRIPT: Hello and welcome to Universal Shipping News, where we ask, “What the freight is going on with international shipping?” I’m Jared Vineyard The Federal Maritime Commission or FMC has officially approved the OCEAN Alliance, a vessel sharing agreement between CMA CGM, China COSCO Shipping Corporation, Evergreen Line and Orient Overseas Container Line (OOCL) that is scheduled to begin cooperative operations in April of next year. The Ocean Alliance will still need approval from European and Chinese regulators, but is expected to get that approval. Only one carrier alliance has ever failed to get these approvals, and that was when China’s Ministry of Commerce halted the P3 Network back in 2014. With its own China COSCO Shipping Corporation in the OCEAN Alliance, it’s very unlikely China will say no to the alliance moving forward. By the end of next year, all of ocean shipping should be run by three major alliances: 2M, OCEAN alliance, and THE Alliance or THE Alliance—I’m not sure how I’m supposed to say that one, but it doesn’t really matter because that alliance was supposed to include Hanjin Shipping, and, well, yeah. They’ll have to rethink things. Which hopefully includes a new name. Speaking of Hanjin Shipping, the bankrupt carrier is looking closer and closer to complete liquidation as the announcement was made it is closing its European operations. This is on top of news of Hanjin working on selling it stake in Total Terminals International (TTI) at the Port of Long Beach, putting its Asia to U.S. assets up for sale, along with trying to sell the ships it owns. I guess that’s what happens when you owe $5.5 billion and the bank says, “Pay up.” All right, for more on these stories and all your international shipping needs, check out UniversalCargo.com. Please like, subscribe, and… Until next time, stay in shipshape!
Views: 293 Universal Cargo
Universal Shipping News Vlog #5
 
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More on this story - http://www.universalcargo.com/blog/here-comes-china-cosco-shipping-corporation-limited-shipping-leviathan Transcript: Hello and welcome to Universal Shipping News, where we ask, “What the freight is going on with international shipping?” I’m Jared Vineyard Heeere’s China Cosco Shipping Corporation Limited! Man, that’s not as catchy as here’s Johnny. Heeere’s Johnny! The merger between the two, big, state owned shipping companies--China Cosco Group and China Shipping Group was approved by China's Anti-Monopoly Bureau of the Ministry of Commerce. Not surprising, considering China’s government pushed for the merger in the first place. What this means is a huge new shipping company is hitting the international shipping waters this month! Wall Street Journal calls the merged company a “Shipping Leviathan.” Leviathan? What the freight? “Can you pull in Leviathan with a fishhook or tie down its tongue with a rope? Can you put a cord through its nose or pierce its jaw with a hook? ... Can you fill its hide with harpoons or its head with fishing spears? If you lay a hand on it, you will remember the struggle and never do it again! Any hope of subduing it is false; the mere sight of it is overpowering. ... Nothing on earth is its equal— a creature without fear. It looks down on all that are haughty; it is king over all that are proud.” China Cosco Shipping Corporation Limited—still a mouthful—will give A.P. Møller Maersk a run for its money as the world’s largest shipping company. In terms of ship value, China Cosco Shipping Corporation Limited is now the world’s largest shipping company with a fleet of 832 vessels worth about 22 billion dollars. 22 Billion dollars? That’s not a real number. Maersk has 262 ships worth $12.3 billion. Since all of those are container ships, Maersk is still the world’s largest carrier in terms of capacity. But China Cosco Shipping Corporation Limited is now number 2 in that category. Where this merger gets a bit dicey— Did I just say dicey? What am I, a zoot suit wearing, race track betting, musical singing gangster from the 1950’s? This is lookin real dicey, see. Somebody get Nicely-Nicely Johnson and Benny Southstreet so I can sing about Guys and Dolls. Where this merger gets dicey is in terms of carrier alliances. China Shipping Group is part of the Ocean 3 carrier alliance and China COSCO Group is part of the CKYHE Alliance. It seems doubtful that regulators around the world are going to allow this new shipping leviathan to be part of both alliances. In fact, the merger may have trouble getting approval from regulators in general, which it needs for global shipping operations. Afterall, the U.S. and Europe don’t have the same vested interest in the merger that China has. For more on this story, go to Universal Cargo’s blog. A link is provided. If you have questions pertaining to international shipping, ask us on Facebook or Twitter with the hash tag: #WhatTheFreight Until next time, stay in shipshape!
Views: 165 Universal Cargo
Shippers Pay for Skipping Cargo Insurance - Universal Shipping News
 
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MORE: http://www.universalcargo.com/blog/ TRANSCRIPT: Hello and welcome to Universal Shipping News, where we ask, “What the freight is going on with international shipping?” I’m Jared Vineyard I read this week that 9 out of 10 shipping containers imported to the U.S. travel uninsured. 9 out of 10. What the freight? All you have to do is scroll through a few recent international shipping news stories to see what a bad idea not insuring cargo is. Over just the last few weeks, there are two separate incidents of U.S. Navy destroyers colliding with other ships, one an oil tanker and the other a cargo ship, in international waters. That’s actually a whole ‘nother “What the freight?”. How is the Navy suddenly crashing left and right? I mean, people died in both of these collisions. But frankly, collisions happen all the time between ships. A Maersk container ship collided with a tug-pulled vessel this month. Also this month a Pacific International Lines container ship collided with a chemical tanker… Container ship collisions happen. And they put cargo at risk of loss or damage. And collisions aren’t even nearly the only risk to cargo when importing and exporting. Why don’t shippers insure their cargo? Too expensive? Let’s say this dollar is the value of your cargo. What does it take insure that dollar? A quarter? No. A dime? Uh-uh. A nickel? Nope. A penny? Not even that. Usually it takes half a penny to insure the dollar. I can’t even break this in half—you know what? I’ll give the whole penny to insure the dollar. Here, take it. Shippers, double check that your cargo is properly insured. Frankly, it’s too expensive not to. For more details on this story, and all your international shipping needs, go to UniversalCargo.com. If you liked this video, please give it that thumbs up like, share, subscribe, and… Until next time, stay in shipshape!
Views: 144 Universal Cargo
Maersk Hit By Cyber Attack! - Universal Shipping News
 
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Maersk Hit by Cyber Attack - Read More: http://www.universalcargo.com/maersk-hit-by-cyber-attack/ Transcript: Hello and welcome to Universal Shipping News, where we ask, “What the freight is going on with international shipping?” I’m Jared Vineyard The big news out of international shipping is Maersk, the world’s largest carrier by capacity, was hit by a cyberattack. This cyber attack was massive, not just hitting Maersk, but many companies across several countries, but, of course, our interest here is what is happening in international shipping, affecting importers and exporters. And the way this cyber attack affects Maersk has major implications for shippers. Not only has this cyber attack affected Maersk Line’s operations, but the terminals around the world that Maersk operates. In fact, terminals at the Ports of New York, New Jersey, and Los Angeles had to close down as Maersk worked to get their systems under control. Maersk is still working hard to recover from this cyberattack, doing their best to minimize its impact on shippers whose cargo Maersk is handling. For more details on this story, and all your international shipping needs, check out the blog at UniversalCargo.com. Please like this video, share, subscribe, and… Until next time, stay in shipshape!
Views: 706 Universal Cargo
U.S. & China Spiraling Into Trade War? - Universal Shipping News
 
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READ MORE ABOUT U.S. & CHINA TARIFFS & POSSIBLE TRADE WAR: http://www.universalcargo.com/trade-war-watch-china-ups-retaliation-but-markets-relax/ http://www.universalcargo.com/is-the-us-entering-a-full-fledged-trade-war-with-china/
Views: 95 Universal Cargo
Shipping News - NY/NJ Port Strike, Panama Canal Delay, VGM
 
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Story Links: ILA Strike Shipping News Alert: http://www.universalcargo.com/blog/shipping-news-alert-sudden-labor-strike-ports-of-ny-nj What's Going on With the Panama Canal? - http://www.universalcargo.com/blog/whats-going-on-with-the-panama-canal-expansion Verified Gross Mass International Shipping Rule: http://www.universalcargo.com/blog/new-international-shipping-rule Transcript: Hello and welcome to Universal Shipping News, where we ask, “What the freight is going on with international shipping?” I am your host Jared Vineyard. Terminals at the Ports of New York and New Jersey suddenly and unexpectedly shut down on the morning of Friday, January 29th when over 4,000 International Longshoremen's Association dockworkers walked off the job and into a strike. There was no warning. No known reason. Port officials had no idea what sparked the strike, but do know it’s it's an illegal walk-off according Phoebe Sorial, general counsel for the Waterfront Commission of New York Harbor. It’s not just employers at the NY and NJ ports screaming, “What the freight!” but and truckers, who can’t get into the terminals and shippers too, whose cargo is suddenly not moving. The whole nation should be yelling What the Freight as strikes shutting down major US ports are hugely costly to our country’s economy. Speaking of not moving, the projected completion Panama Canal Expansion has been pushed back. Again. It’s gone from supposed to be completed in October of 2014 to April of 2015 to April of 2016 to now, according to a national address from Panama’s president Juan Carlos Varela, “Around the month of May,”. Around the month of May? What the freight does that mean? May? June? July? With the consortium that contracted the expansion job, Grupo Unidos por el Canal facing a criminal investigation for allegedly inflating its cost overruns on the project, even more delays would not be surprising. Lastly, shippers should be aware of an international shipping rule change that goes into effect July 1st, of this year. To get your cargo loaded on ships, you need to provide a Verified Gross Mass. We’ll call it VGM because Verified Gross Mass sounds like a medical condition. What the freight? Yeah, that is definitely a gross mass. You should have a doctor check that out. Providing proper VGM means that shippers need to use calibrated and certified equipment to weigh all loaded shipping containers, or weigh all cargo items and packing materials that will be loaded into a shipping container and add that weight to the container’s weight as well as provide the proper paperwork declaring the verified weight of every single shipping container shipped. For more information on these stories, check out Universal Cargo’s blog. If you have questions pertaining to international shipping, ask us on Facebook or Twitter with the hash tag: #WhatTheFreight Until next time, stay in shipshape!
Views: 373 Universal Cargo
Hanjin Assets, Maersk, Carrier Collapse, China's U.S. Export Ban - Universal Shipping News
 
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MORE ON HANJIN'S ASSETS FOR SALE - http://www.universalcargo.com/hanjin-asia-u-s-assets-for-sale-what-it-means/ MORE ON HIGH RISK OF MORE CARRIER COLLAPSES -http://www.universalcargo.com/theres-high-risk-of-more-carrier-collapses-says-drewry/ MORE ON CHINA LIFTING BAN ON U.S. BEEF EXPORTS - http://www.universalcargo.com/china-about-to-have-beef-with-u-s-exports-thats-a-good-thing/ MORE ON MAERSK SPLITTING & GOING AFTER OTHER CARRIERS - http://www.universalcargo.com/divide-conquer-maersk-splits-to-go-after-competition/ TRANSCRIPT: Hello and welcome to Universal Shipping News, where we ask, “What the freight is going on with international shipping?” I’m Jared Vineyard Anyone want to buy Hanjin Shipping? No? No. Yeah, no one wants to buy Hanjin Shipping, but the bankrupt carrier’s stock did just go up after the announcement was made that its Asia to U.S. assets are being put up for sale. Last time I talked about Maersk, the biggest shipping line in international shipping by capacity, splitting into two divisions. ~Maersk, the biggest shipping line in international shipping by capacity is splitting into two divisions~ See? Many think with one division focused on international shipping and acquiring struggling carriers, this will mean Maersk will swoop in to buy Hanjin’s assets, but not likely. Not even Maersk wants to buy Hanjin. Maersk is more likely to leave Hanjin’s assets alone and go after acquiring carriers that haven’t gone bankrupt yet to shrink the competition pool. Or competition ocean? There are plenty of struggling carriers for Maersk to go after. According to Drewry Maritime Research’s, um, research it looks like almost all carriers in the international shipping industry have been in financial stress for years and the risk of more major carrier collapses, like Hanjin’s, is high. And between you and me… and Drewry, and anyone around the world who’s read Drewry’s public articles about their research, Maersk isn’t exactly the perfect picture of financial health either. In other international shipping news, China has a beef with U.S. exports. Well, China has no beef with U.S. exports. China’s beef with U.S. exports is that it has no beef with U.S. exports, but it’s about to have beef… start over. Hello and welcome to, no not that far back. China is about to lift a ban on importing U.S. beef. This is huge news for U.S. agricultural exports! So, moo. All right, for more on these stories and all your international shipping needs, check out UniversalCargo.com. Please like, subscribe, and… Until next time, stay in shipshape!
Views: 470 Universal Cargo
Devin's 7's - Business Tips in Asia - Part 7a - Language Tips Lesson 1
 
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http://universalcargo.com Devin Burke, CEO of Universal Cargo Management, Inc. shares pragmatic advice on language and culture in this "how to" series for Business Travelers.
Views: 204 Universal Cargo
Part 6 - Managing Your Human Resources - 4 Tips On Managing Strengths & Weaknesses - Devin's 7's
 
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http://www.UniversalCargo.com Devin's 7's 7 HR Tips to Managing Your Human Resources Part 6 - 4 Tips On Managing Strengths & Weaknesses In the first part of this seven part series, Devin Burke, CEO at UCM, leads a panel in a discussion about tips on managing strengths and weaknesses. Devin sits along with Kamy Eliassi, Managing Director at UCM, and Scott Jette, CEO at Credo Consulting, and discusses D.I.S.C. Personalities, challenging employees, riding a bus, and jaguars. We hope you enjoy this series of Devin's 7's. We aim to educate as well as entertain. Feel free to subscribe or interact with us all over the internet via our website, blog, or social media accounts.
Views: 391 Universal Cargo
WORKING A TRADESHOW
 
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Devin Burke (CEO at Universal Cargo) takes you through his tips and experiences for working a trade show. intro music by http://www.bensound.com
Views: 140 Universal Cargo
PierPass 2.0 to Hit November 19th - Universal Shipping News
 
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Fees at the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach are about to be lowered as a new appointment system is put in place. MORE: https://www.universalcargo.com/pierpass-2-0-to-go-into-effect-november-19th-at-ports-of-la-lb/
Views: 55 Universal Cargo
High Point Market Furniture Trade Show Interview Spring 2012 (2/4)
 
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http://www.universalcargo.com Devin Burke, CEO of Universal Cargo Management, chats with exhibitors at the High Point Market Furniture Trade Show Spring 2012. They give their insight on the furniture market. http://www.highpointmarket.org The High Point Market Furniture Trade Show took place April 21-26, 2012. The next High Point Market Furniture Trade Show will be October 13-18, 2012. If you have any questions, comments, or concerns feel free to comment here, visit our website at http://www.UniversalCargo.com, or call us. In order of appearance: Fred (Designer) Rob Bramble with The Bramble CO http://www.brambleco.com/ Chuck Wittrock with Frantic Fern http://franticfernaz.com/ Khrys & Lynne McArdle with Alden Parkes http://www.aldenparkes.com/ Barbara Simeon with Jewels of Java http://www.jewelsofjava.com/ Eddie Spielberg with Judith Edwards Designs http://www.judithedwardsdesigns.net/ Peter Selmeci with Toucan Trading http://www.toucantrading.com/ John Wampler with Amelia Homes http://www.coe.com.cn/ Michael Feeder with Trade Winds Furniture http://www.tradewindsfurniture.com/ Ray Steele with Gail's Accents http://www.gailsaccents.com/ Phil with Chelsea House http://www.chelseahouseinc.com/
Views: 1459 Universal Cargo
Maersk No Longer Number One - Universal Shipping News (Funny Blooper at the End)
 
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READ MORE: http://www.universalcargo.com/maersk-is-no-longer-1-carrier/ TRANSCRIPT: Hello and welcome to Universal Shipping News, where we ask, “What the freight is going on with international shipping?” I’m Jared Vineyard. Here’s what the freight’s going on with international shipping. Maersk is no longer the world’s number one ocean carrier in terms of shipping cargo by volume. Are you shipping me? China Cosco Shipping Corporation, dubbed the shipping leviathan, outshipped Maersk, ocean freight’s perennial top dog, in the third quarter here in 2017 by about a quarter of a million TEU. With Cosco’s acquisition of OOCL set to give the shipping leviathan more growth than Maersk is set to get from its acquisition of Hamburg Süd, it looks like the leviathan just ate the top dog. Maersk will have to make some moves if it wants to regain its number one position. And in actuality, Maersk might be number 3 at this point. For more information on that, you'll have to read the blog at UniversalCargo.com, where you can get all your international shipping needs met. If you liked this video, please give it that thumbs up like. You don't like it, give it that thumbs down thing. Feel free to subscribe, share it, and... Until next time, stay in shipshape! There's a blooper at the end.
Views: 189 Universal Cargo
TOP 10 INTERNATIONAL SHIPPING NEWS STORIES OF 2017 - Universal Shipping News
 
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READ MORE: http://www.universalcargo.com/top-10-international-shipping-news-stories-of-2017/ In this video we count down the top 10 international shipping news stories of 2017. #10 — FREIGHT RATES INCREASE FOR A WHILE THEN SLIP #9 — AUTOMATED CARGO SHIPS ON THE WAY #8 — Maersk Out-Shipped by Cosco #7 — SOUTH CHINA SEA TENSIONS INTENSIFY #6 — CHINA POLLUTION CRACKDOWN SHUTS DOWN THOUSANDS OF FACTORIES #5 — HURRICANES HITTING US CITIES & PORTS #4 — CHINA CUTS TARIFFS #3 — 3 MEGA CARRIER ALLIANCES TAKE OVER #2 — ILWU AGREES TO EARLY CONTRACT EXTENSION #1 — SHRINKING CARRIER COMPETITION
Views: 155 Universal Cargo
Trade War On Hold - Universal Shipping News
 
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READ MORE: http://www.universalcargo.com/us-china-trade-war-on-hold-happy-world-trade-week/
Views: 70 Universal Cargo
THE Carrier Alliance Falls Behind Competition - Universal Shipping News
 
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READ MORE: http://www.universalcargo.com/is-the-alliance-in-trouble/ TRANSCRIPT: Hello and welcome to Universal Shipping News, where we ask, “What the freight is going on with international shipping?” I’m Jared Vineyard A carrier alliance story made a splash in international shipping last week. Alphaliner analysis says that because the THE Alliance has fallen behind in acquiring megaships, it could have significantly higher costs per TEU than the alliances its competing against, 2M and Ocean Alliance. $500 per TEU higher costs. $500 more in costs per TEU on shipments from Asia to North Europe than 2M or Ocean Alliance, could put the THE Alliance in trouble. For more details on this story, and all your international shipping needs, go to UniversalCargo.com. If you liked this video, please give it that thumbs up like, share, subscribe, and… Until next time, stay in shipshape!
Views: 87 Universal Cargo
Trump Threatens $450 Billion in Tariffs on Chinese Goods - Universal Shipping News
 
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Read more: https://www.universalcargo.com/450-billion-in-tariffs-on-chinese-goods-is-this-getting-out-of-hand/ President Trump threatens to hit China with $450 billion worth of tariffs.
Views: 177 Universal Cargo
ILWU Voting on Early Contract Extension - Universal Shipping News
 
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READ MORE: http://www.universalcargo.com/ilwu-to-vote-on-early-contract-extension-and-it-could-pass/ TRANSCRIPT: Hello and welcome to Universal Shipping News, where we ask, “What the freight is going on with international shipping?” I’m Jared Vineyard Okay, listen up, this is huge news for U.S. shippers, West Coast ports, and everyone, really, in the supply chain. The ILWU is voting on a contract extension. The current contract expires in 2019. This extension would add three more years of labor stability at West Coast ports with a 2022 expiration date. Here’s why this is huge news. Normally, the dockworker unions do not extend contracts or agree to new contracts before the previous one expires. The ILA doesn’t do it. The ILWU doesn’t do it. This is basically an unofficial policy that preserves the union’s ability to use slowdowns, strikes, and the threat of strikes as leverage in contract negotiations. The big losers in this situation is U.S. shippers every time a new contract has to be negotiated. When the last contract expired in 2014, prolonged negotiations between the ILWU and the PMA turned contentious, the ILWU hit ports with slowdowns, the PMA hit back with mini-lockouts, and the U.S. economy took a hit in the billions of dollars. Many shippers still feel the sting of those last negotiations, so news that an extension happening could postpone a similar situation by three years is huge, huge news. What’s even bigger, is the ILWU member I asked about the vote thinks the extension will be approved by the rank and file. For more details on this story, and all your international shipping needs, check out the blog at UniversalCargo.com. Please like this video, share, subscribe, and… Until next time, stay in shipshape!
Views: 499 Universal Cargo
High Point Furniture Trade Show
 
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http://universalcargo.com Devin Burke, CEO of Universal Cargo Management, travels to High Point, NC to visit clients at the Fall show.
Views: 2377 Universal Cargo
Maersk & IBM Team to Innovate Shipping - Universal Shipping News
 
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READ MORE: http://www.universalcargo.com/holy-crap-maersk-ibm-team-up-to-change-international-shipping/ TRANSCRIPT: Hello and welcome to Universal Shipping News, where we ask, “What the freight is going on with international shipping?” I’m Jared Vineyard Maersk, the world’s largest carrier by capacity, is teaming up with IBM—yes, that IBM—to revolutionize the shipping industry. These two giant companies are forming a joint-venture company to commercialize a world-wide, digital shipping platform. The two companies have been working together on this digital shipping platform since 2016. The platform threatens to finally drag the shipping industry into the digital age, enabling document sharing across a global network, creating much needed transparency in the industry and reducing costly delays. If approval of Maersk and IBM’s joint venture goes smoothly, the new company’s platform could be available to the shipping industry somewhere in the middle of this year. For more details on this story, and all your international shipping needs, go to UniversalCargo.com. If you liked this video, please give it that thumbs up like, share, subscribe, and… Until next time, stay in shipshape!
Views: 158 Universal Cargo
International Air Cargo Shipping by Universal Cargo Management UCM
 
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http://www.UniversalCargo.com/International-Air-Cargo-Shipping/ Universal Cargo Management provides air cargo services for international imports and exports. As with ocean freight, we can handle your cargo from door to door, terminal to terminal and terminal to door. We can ship your goods to and from almost anywhere in the world. Our staff of air cargo specialist can offer you personalized service. We will take the time to first understand your specific needs and tailor our services to match your shipping requirements. UCM is experienced in handling all types of air cargo shipments from large scale projects to smaller express shipments. Compared with ocean freight, air freight is faster and safer. While air freight services are generally costlier then ocean freight, you can often send your goods in 1-3 days to almost any location in the world. Air freight differs from other types of freight because the cost is based on weight. UCM can provide competitive rates for cargo over 100 kg (220 lbs). For smaller shipments, under 100 kg (220 lbs), we offer Express4Air (http://www.UniversalCargo.com/Express4Air/)
Views: 2779 Universal Cargo

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